Students will engage in a silent discussion activity

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Students will complete textbook reading assignments and reading quizzes as enumerated below. Students will engage in a silent discussion activity exploring the use of “civilization” as an organizing principle in World History (SB-4) Students will use the Torah as an historical document to analyze how the Hebrews lived, including: foods, social structure, housing, clothing. (CUL-2) Students will read the article by Dr. Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe: Christianity and the Roman Empire and create a thesis statement to answer the question: “In the space of a few hundred years, a small, often brutally persecuted cult rose to become the dominant religion of the West. How did it happen?” (CUL-1) Students will utilize a chart comparison of Cofucianism, Legalism, and Doaism through the interpretation of the basic tenets of each as they relate to modern social situations (CUL-2) Students will use the Sherman and Grunfeld reader to compare the status of women in Greek, Roman and Chinese society; i.e.: “ Poem on Women ” by Semonides of Amorgos, and a picture of a 5th century Greek jar depicting the daily activities of Greek women with “ A Confucian poem: The Role of Women (SOC-1) Key Concept 2.2: The Development of States and Empires Students will complete textbook reading assignments and reading quizzes as enumerated below. Students will use the Conrad-Demarist Model of Empire as a structure for the writing of the comparison essay comparing Rome and Han China . (SB-1) Students will identify, evaluate, and compare the similarities and differences between the causes and consequences of the declines of the Han, Roman, and Gupta Empires. (SB-2) Key Concept 2.3: Emergence of Transregional Networks of Communication and Exchange Students will complete textbook reading assignments and reading quizzes as enumerated below . Students will identify similarities and differences, and map the long distance trade networks in Eurasian world , including the Silk Roads, trans-Saharan routes, Indian Ocean routes, and the Mediterranean world. (ECON-7) Unit 3: Regional and Interregional Interactions – c. 600 C.E. to 1450 C.E. Length of Unit: 2 Weeks Dates of Unit: February 26 to March 9 Text: Stearns, Chapter 11-20 Major Topics: Rise of Islam; Sunni-Shia division; Islamic politics and culture; diffusion of Islam into West Africa, Spain, Anatolia, India, and the Indian Ocean basin; medieval Germanic kingdoms in Western Europe; European feudalism and manorialism; the Byzantine Empire; Catholic and Orthodox Christianity; the Crusades; Sui, Tang, and Song China; diffusion of Buddhism in Central, East, and Southeast Asia; productivity and economics in Song China; environmental and demographic change on islands in Oceania; rise of the Mongols; Mongol Khanates; trade and exchange during Mongol rule; interregional trade along Silk Road, Trans-Saharan, Mediterranean, and Indian Ocean routes; Heian Japan; Islamic Ghana, Mali and Songhai; Aztec society; Incan society; and Zheng He and the Ming presence in the Indian Ocean.
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