Upon auscultation prolonged expiration accompanied by expiratory wheezes was

Upon auscultation prolonged expiration accompanied by

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mild dyspnea when climbing onto the exam table. Upon auscultation prolonged expiration accompanied by expiratory wheezes was observed. The chest X-ray indicated scarring and hyperinflation of the lungs. The Patients spirometry results came back concerning (National Jewish Health, 2013). Her 1 second Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) was 1.5L/sec. Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) was 4L
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3. Identify the muscles involved in respiration. When you take a deep breath or just inhale, your diaphragm contracts and increases the volume of the thoracic cavity, giving your lungs the room to expand into it. Simultaneously the small muscle in-between your ribs also help expand the chest. 4. How are these muscles responsible for the process of ventilation? These two muscle groups; the diaphragm and the intercostal muscles are primarily responsible during normal inspiration. The contraction of these groups brings the rib cage upward and outward allowing the rib cage to expand. 5. If her condition does not progress, why would corticosteroids be used in the inhaler? Emphysema is known to be a long progressive disease of the lungs. Causing symptoms in patients like shortness of breath due to over inflation of the alveoli. Commonly in patients with Emphysema the lung tissue becomes severely impaired or destroyed. The used of nocturnal oxygen is to ensure good oxygen saturation while the patient is asleep. The use of Corticosteroids used to decrease the inflammation in the lungs. Which causes air passages to open up ad allow better gas exchange (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research [MFMER], 2020).
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References Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). (2020). Emphysema. Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from - conditions/emphysema/symptoms-causes/syc-20355555 National Jewish Health. (2013, December). Spirometry testing. National Jewish Health. Retrieved from - physiology/pulmonary-function/spirometry
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