Breakdown of enzymes and bacteria in proteins

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Breakdown of enzymes and bacteria in proteins, moisture, milk selection, curing, and ripening process 11) What criteria are used to grade cheese? Variety, flavor, texture, finish, color, and appearance. Some cheese are also graded for salf level and eyes. 12) Describe what factors should be controlled when cooking cheese? Selecting the best cheese and keeping temperatures low and heating times short 13) What types of cheeses (i.e., what do they have in common?) can be successfully stored in the freezer? The water content of a cheese determines whether or not it can be successfully frozen. Most hard natural cheeses with low water content can be frozen for up to 2 months and process cheese for up to 5 months, but freezing is not recommended for soft cheeses with high water content. Most suitable cheeses for freezing include brick, cheddar, edam, gouda, gruyere, parmesan, provolone, and swiss. 14) Define the following terms from Chapter 11: a. curd treatment: treatment to remove more whey from cheese curd by cutting, heating, salting, knitting and/or pressing b. knitting: when the curd is united or melted into a solid mass through the use of heat c. curing: the aging of cheese in controlled conditions of temperature and humidity d. ripening: the chemical and physical changes that occur during the curing period e. process cheese: a cheese made from blending one or more varieties of cheese, with or without heat, and mixing the result with other ingredients f. cold-pack cheese: cheese made from pasteurized milk products that may be combined with milk, MSNF, cream, or whey g. process cheese food: foods made from at least 51% natural cheese by weight, as well as milk, cream, oil, or whey h. imitation cheese: cheese-like products in which the milk fat has been replaced with vegetable oil Chapter 12: Eggs 15) Describe the general structure of an egg. How does an egg change over time as it ages? The egg has 5 major structural components: yolk, albumen/egg white, shell membrane, air cell, and shell. As an egg ages, it loses co2 and moisture through the shell pores, Page 3 of 5
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causing the air cell to replace the moisture and the pH to become more basic, changing the structure of the albumen. 16) What factors influence the color of the egg yolk? What about the egg shell? The egg yolk will appear darker if the egg has been fertilized. The color also depends on the hen’s diet; pigments in the feed can cause colors ranging from pale yellow to deep red. Shell color indicates the hen’s breed; brown eggs usually come from larger hens which require more food and produce fewer eggs, so they typically cost more, but nutrient content is not changed. 17) How are eggs graded, i.e., what methods are used?
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  • Summer '17
  • Tracy Grgich

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