Today it is a feminist icon being that she looks as though she has movie star

Today it is a feminist icon being that she looks as

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Today it is a feminist icon being that she looks as though she has movie-star looks, hair pulled back, with sleeves rolled up as though she is about to get work done (McGrath, C.). The image was of a patriotic stand point or an iconic embodiment of what women’s rights looked like. In the 1942 image is was a symbol of femininity and of housewives who would return to their domestic duties at wars end (McGrath, C.). Now the image is a hopeful one for women today ever changing to match that of a modern woman with sometimes of alterations to the overall appearance to encourage all women of whatever background and ethnicity that they can do it. Conclusion Overall the infamous “Rosie the Riveter,” is an image to look up to and inspire women that doing a job that society believes that they can’t do, can be done. The real “Rosie” that inspired the original poster in 1942, Naomi Parker-Fraley will now be known. But with also knowing that the true inspiration was of the women that came together in during a time that help was needed to keep the war supplied and get their men home fast was theirs to bear as a collection of women. Inspiration came from many with the name still as a mystery as to why she bore the name, “Rosie”, it could have been from many reasons unknown. The image today can be seen as more powerful than it once was changing and inspiring the youth of today as it inspired the women of the 1940’s to join the effort.
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ROSIE 12 References ANB (200) American National Biography Online: The life of a nation is told by the lives of its people… Rosie the Riveter Bruk, D. (Sept 7, 2016) Meet the 95-year-old Real-life Rosie the Riveter Dunlap, T. (Oct 5, 2016) See Rosie the Riveter at 95: Woman who inspired WWII poster was lost to history for 7 decades - woman-who-inspired-the-iconic-poster/ History A&E (2017) Rosie the Riveter - riveter Honey, M. (1984). Creating Rosie the Riveter: Class, Gender, and Propaganda During World War II . Amherst, Mass: University of Massachusetts Press. Retrieved on 19 November 2017 Hoyt, A. (November 3, 2008) "Who was Rosie the Riveter?" HowStuffWorks.com - riveter.htm McEuen, M. (April 1, 2014) Donna B. Knaff. Beyond Rosie the Riveter: Women of World War II in American popular graphic art Journal of American History, Volume 119, Issue 2, pg. 550-551 Retrieved 16 November 2017 McGrath, C., Rosie the Riveter, Reluctant Symbol of Patriarchy %20Symbol%20of%20Patriarchy.pdf M.M.B. (1995). Rosie the Riveter: Women Working on the Home Front in World War II. Horn Book Magazine , 71 (5), 617. UMUC Library Retrieved 19 November 2017 National Museum of American History (2017) “We Can Do It!” Schneider, C. (May 2, 2015) Meet the Real Rosie the Riveter
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