The period from may through september is the tourist

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Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
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Chapter AE / Exercise 15
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
Johnson/Mowry
Expert Verified
The period from May through September is the tourist season in Europe. During this time, extra caution, alertness, and patience are required. Autobahn travel is extremely difficult during the start of school vacations, which vary among the German States. Persons planning a trip during the summer should check with a German automobile club to determine when periods of heavy traffic are expected.
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Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
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Chapter AE / Exercise 15
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
Johnson/Mowry
Expert Verified
18 AE Pam 190-34/USAFE Pam 31-206 16 Nov 10 b. Converting Kph to Mph. Speed limits in Europe (except for the United Kingdom) are expressed in kph. U.S. Forces drivers must be able to convert kph to mph, especially when driving a vehicle with a speedometer gauged in miles. A quick conversion formula from kilometers to miles is to multiply the kilometers by 6 and drop the last digit of the result (for example, 30 kilometers x 6 = 180 = 18 miles). c. Types of Speed Limits. Germany has two types of speed limits: (1) Posted Limits. Signs 274 and 274.1 indicate the maximum speed allowed; sign 275 indicates the minimum speed allowed. (2) Unposted Limits. These are speed limits that apply to certain types of vehicles or on certain types of roads (d through f below). d. Cities, Towns, and Villages. If no higher or lower speed is posted, the speed limit within city limits is 50 kph (31 mph) for all vehicles, except for vehicles with a lower speed limitation (for example, Mofas ), which are limited to a top speed of 25 kph. (1) The city boundaries in which this unposted limit applies are indicated by a sign bearing the name of the city, town, or village (sign 310). (2) After sign 310, drivers must not exceed 50 kph (31 mph) until the speed limit is lifted by a higher posted limit or a sign indicating the driver is leaving the city boundaries (sign 311 or 311-40). (3) All cities also have 30 kph (18 mph) zones in residential and business districts (sign 274.1). (4) The speed limit on all U.S. Forces property is 30 kph (18 mph) unless otherwise posted. e. Roads Outside City Limits. For vehicles other than those in subparagraph f below, German traffic regulations establish a permanent speed limit of 100 kph (62 mph) on roads outside city limits unless otherwise posted. Exceptions are as follows: (1) Autobahns (sign 330) inside cities. While driving on autobahns through cities, autobahn rules still apply. (2) Contrary to popular belief, many autobahns have speed limits. Where no limit exists, the recommended speed limit for single vehicles with up to 3.5 tons of authorized loaded weight is 130 kph. This recommended speed limit should be observed even under the best road, traffic, and weather conditions. In addition, drivers must consider their driving experience, the speed rating of their vehicle’s tires, and the vehicle load. Drivers who exceed 130 kph will be held liable if they have an accident. (3) Multilane roads having at least two lanes in each direction that are divided by guard rails, median strips, or other construction. (4) Unposted speed limits on the autobahn or comparable, multilane roads for certain vehicles are as follows: (a) 60 kph (36 mph) for motorcycles with trailers, construction machines, tractors with trailers, and buses with passengers for whom seats are not available.

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