Google scholar 57 for instance n higham the context

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[Google Scholar] 57. For instance, N. Higham, ‘The Context of Brunanburh’, in Names , Places and People , ed. A. R. Rumble and A. D. Mills (Stamford, 1997), pp. 144–56, esp. p. 152; P. Cavill, ‘The Place-Name Debate’, in The Battle of Brunanburh: A Casebook , ed. Livingston, pp. 337–9; but it was taken seriously by most earlier scholars, among them Turner, Palgrave, Lappenburg, J. Stevenson, Skene, Green, Ramsay; and by C. H. Pearson, Historical Maps of England , rev. edn (London, 1883), a pioneering study in historical geography including a map, pp. 24–5, on which Stenton based his end map. v
Pearson (pp. 38–9) felt that the sources ‘point to a battle on the southern con²nes of the Humber… not far from York’, and perhaps, if John of Worcester’s account can be trusted, ‘in the region of Conisbrough’. Peter Sawyer agrees, in Anglo-Saxon Lincolnshire (Lincoln, 1998), p. 121. [Google Scholar] 58. A. H. Smith, The Place-Names of the East Riding of Yorkshire (EPNS, 1937), pp. 285–6. [Google Scholar] 59. ‘Historia Regum’, pp. 93–94. This set of Northumbrian annals was also used by Roger of Wendover, p. 395; its chronology appears to be more reliable than that of Anglo-Saxon Chronicle MS D, which as Plummer noted in Two Saxon Chronicles , ii (Oxford, 1899), p. lxxxi, incorporates doublets and disjoints the order of events: see in detail Anglo- Saxon Chronicle MS D , pp. xxvi–xxvii, xxxv–xxxix. [Google Scholar] 60. Dodgson, ‘Background to Brunanburh’, p. 68. [Google Scholar] 61. Professor Gelling in a letter to the author; but see the caveat above, fn. 43. [Google Scholar] 62. Brinsley, Notts, is a case in point, a Bruna name but evidently named after the 1086 tenant: The Place-Names of Nottinghamshire , ed. J. Gover, A. Mawer and F. M. Stenton (Cambridge, 1940), p. 117. [Google Scholar] 63. Dodgson, ‘Background to Brunanburh’, p. 314; Wirral and its Viking Heritage , p. 68. [Google Scholar] 64. Dodgson, ‘Background to Brunanburh’, pp. 315–16; Wirral and its Viking Heritage , p. 69; cf. Dodgson, Place-Names of Cheshire , pp. 239–40. [Google Scholar] 65. Sawyer S407. [Google Scholar] 66. ‘Historia Regum’, pp. 93–94; Anglo-Saxon Chronicle: MS D , sub anno 943, pp. 43–4; Roger of Wendover, pp. 395–6. [Google Scholar] 67. K. Cameron, The Place-Names of Derbyshire (Cambridge, 1959), 2, p. 240 (Dor), and p. 327 (Whitwell). [Google Scholar] 68. P. Sawyer, Charters of Burton Abbey (Oxford, 1979), pp. xxxviii–xlvii. [Google Scholar] 69. References to this route — the via regia (regalis) , alta strata or magnum chiminium — from the twelfth century are in R. T. Timson, The Cartulary of Blyth (London, 1973), p. 551, with maps after p. lxxxviii and p. xcix; see, too, C. J. Holdsworth, Ru²ord Charters (Nottingham, 1981), 1, p. xxvi, with map p. xxxii; but the estates of Wulfsy Maur’s family (see map in Sawyer, Charters of Burton Abbey , pp. xvi–xvii) show that the Roman road north from Derby was the key strategic route in the tenth century. [Google Scholar] 70. Campbell, Æthelweard , p. 54; cf. Annals of Clonmacnoise , p. 154. [Google Scholar] 71. On Tanshelf, see the excavation report which has now pinpointed a Northumbrian residence with church and chapel: Ian Roberts, Pontefract Castle: Archaeological Excavations , 1982 6 (Leeds, 2002), pp. 9–10. [Google Scholar] 72. ‘John of Wallingford’, p. 49.

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