During an assembly Jack sees the conch as even less important he destroys the

During an assembly jack sees the conch as even less

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respect for it and the other boys. During an assembly, Jack see’s the conch as even less important; he destroys the order and rules that the conch has given. He says, “We don’t need the conch any more. We know who ought to say thins…It’s time some people knew they’ve got to keep quiet and leave deciding
things to the rest of us” (Golding 92). Once the conch began to loose significance, the boys began to act more savagely. Using the bathroom where they had meetings, they act disrespectful to Ralph when he tries to hold meetings, and they painted their faces to look like masks, showing how much the boys have lost their identity, as civilized people. When the conch is broken near the end of the novel that Ralph completely loses his influence over the boys, as if it were contained in the shell and escaped when it shattered. Jack’s desire for power shows signs that savagery has begun to take over his mind. Jack overthrows Ralph as a leader, savagery over powers civilization. He was able to persuade the other boys to join his “tribe.” Which involved hunting and killing pigs, making sacrifices to the beastie and having fun without any rules involved. "Now listen. We might go later to the castle rock. But now I'm going to get more of the biguns away from the conch and all that. We'll kill the pig and give a feast." He paused and went on more slowly. "And about the beast. When we kill we'll leave some of the kill for it. Then it

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