To accurately assess a students ql achievement it may

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to accurately assess a students QL achievement it may be necessary to measure QL achievement within the context of problem complexity, much as is done in diving competitions where two scores are given, one for the difficulty of the dive, and the other for the skill in accomplishing the dive. In this context, that would mean giving one score for the complexity of the problem and another score for the QL achievement in solving the problem.
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Q UANTITATIVE L ITERACY VALUE R UBRIC for more information, please contact [email protected] Definition Quantitative Literacy (QL) – also known as Numeracy or Quantitative Reasoning (QR) – is a "habit of mind," competency, and comfort in working with numerical data. Individuals with strong QL skills possess the ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations. They understand and can create sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence and they can clearly communicate those arguments in a variety of formats (using words, tables, graphs, mathematical equations, etc., as appropriate). Evaluators are encouraged to assign a zero to any work sample or collection of work that does not meet benchmark (cell one) level performance. Capstone 4 Milestones 3 2 1 Interpretation Ability to explain information presented in mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words) Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. Makes appropriate inferences based on that information. For example, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph and makes reasonable predictions regarding what the data suggest about future events. Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. For instance, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph. Provides somewhat accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms, but occasionally makes minor errors related to computations or units. For instance, accurately explains trend data shown in a graph, but may miscalculate the slope of the trend line. Attempts to explain information presented in mathematical forms, but draws incorrect conclusions about what the information means. For example, attempts to explain the trend data shown in a graph, but will frequently misinterpret the nature of that trend, perhaps by confusing positive and negative trends. Representation Ability to convert relevant information into various mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words) Skillfully converts relevant information into an insightful mathematical portrayal in a way that contributes to a further or deeper understanding.
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  • Spring '11
  • online
  • Mathematics education, Numeracy or Quantitative Reasoning

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