Increased female workforce participation time

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Increased female workforce participation, time pressures brought by jobs [5] single and households [6] and lack of cooking skills [7] motivate consumers to purchase ready to eat foods [8]. Ready to eat foods can be defined as complete meals that require little efforts and quickly replace with home-made food [9,10]. Employment status, household size, income level, perceived time pressure, and female workforce participation influence ready to eat food consumption [11,13]. The Theory of Planned Behavior [14] explained consumers’ ready to eat food behaviors. According to this, although attitudes and subjective norms influence the intention to consume ready to eat products, perceived behavioral control had no significant effect. Several psychological factors also affect food choice, including convenience orientation [15-19], food-related lifestyles, and food choice orientation [16, 20-22]. Price also takes an important place in ready to eat food consumption behavior. Swoboda & Morschett (2001) found that convenience food consumers were less price-sensitive than non-
convenience-oriented ones. As a result, consumers of ready to eat foods were willing to pay extra for the meals. Affective attitudes such as satisfaction, pleasure, and excitement appear to influence the intention to consume ready to eat foods [23-25], including investigations of intention to consume ready to eat foods [10]. In determining consumers’ behaviors towards ready to eat foods, taste [26,27] and price [16] is a critical element on ready to eat food choices. Buckley et al., [20], Geeroms et al., [4], Costa et al., [8] analyzed the relationship between health-related motive orientations and ready to eat food consumption. Consumers who are concerned with their health usually try to avoid consuming ready to eat foods. Ready to eat food has traditionally been associated with unhealthy ingredients [7] and perceived as being of lower quality and less healthy than home-made foods [8,19]. Mandelkar et al., [28] have found that convenience is the most affecting intrinsic factor for the purchase behavior of ready to eat foods, followed by extrinsic factors such as availability and product advertisement. The remaining factors, including price, product quality, health consciousness, and the taste did not affect the purchase intention of consumers in Bangkok for ready to eat foods. However, Buckley et al., [20] and De Boer et al., [19] found that health consciousness negatively affects consumers’ ready to eat food purchase decisions. RESEARCH OBJECTIVE The research investigates the relation between extrinsic factors toward consumer purchase intention on Frozen Foods and RTE foods among urban residents in Barangay Pugaro,Balungao Pangasinan. In this research, extrinsic factor dimensions of perceived price, safety, packaging, brand image and convenience were
considered. Additionally, nutritional interest was incorporated in the study to identify its mediating effect between extrinsic factors and dimension) and purchase intention. More specifically, this research aims to achieve the following objectives: a)

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