IV Security Measures and Enforcement An Overview A comprehensive security

Iv security measures and enforcement an overview a

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IV. Security Measures and Enforcement: An Overview A comprehensive security system should include biometric security measures, nonbiometric In-Class Activity Ask students to gather information about two famous security threats that the world has witnessed. Were these threats intentional or unintentional? Have students discuss how these threats were controlled. Discussion Question In the context of computer network security, identify some measures that can protect against data theft and data loss. Do technological advancements act as a boon or bane in protecting data?
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81 security measures, physical security measures, access controls, virtual private networks, data encryption, e-commerce transaction security measures, and Computer Emergency Response Team. A. Biometric Security Measures Biometric security measures use a physiological element that is unique to a person and cannot be stolen lost, copied, or passed on to others. The following list describes some biometric devices: Facial recognition Fingerprints Hand geometry Iris analysis Palm prints Retinal scanning Signature analysis Vein analysis Voice recognition Some drawbacks of biometrics are high cost, users’ reluctance, and complex installation. However, with improvements being made to address these drawbacks, biometrics can be a viable alternative to traditional security measures. B. Nonbiometric Security Measures The three main biometric measures are called back modems, firewalls, and intrusion detection systems. Callback Modems A callback modem verifies whether a user’s access is valid by logging the user off (after he or she attempts to connect to the network) and then calling the user back at a predetermined number. Firewalls A firewall is a combination of hardware and software that acts as a filter or barrier between a private network and external computers or networks, including the Internet. An effective firewall should protect data going from the network as well as data coming into the network. Information being transmitted is stored in what’s called a packet , and after
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82 examining a packet, a firewall can take one of the following actions: Reject the incoming packet Send a warning to the network administrator Send a message to the packet’s sender that the attempt failed Allow the packet to enter (or leave) the private network The main types of firewalls are packet-filtering firewalls, application-filtering firewalls, and proxy servers. Packet-filtering firewalls control data traffic by configuring a router to examine packets passing into and out of the network. These firewalls record all incoming connections, and packets that are rejected might be a warning sign of an unauthorized attempt. Packet-filtering firewalls are somewhat inefficient, however, because they have to examine packets one by one, and they might be difficult to install.
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  • Fall '16
  • Computer data storage, CH1 TESTBANK

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