Immunoglobulin E IgE Least concentrated of the immunoglobulin classes in the

Immunoglobulin e ige least concentrated of the

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Immunoglobulin E (IgE) Least concentrated of the immunoglobulin classes in the circulation Mediator of many common allergic responses Defender against parasites Involved in the inflammatory process IgE located on mast cells, when activated, IgE causes degranulation of the mast cells releasing histamine Allergic reaction, rhinitis, watery eyes, itchy nose Inflammatory response Parasites Most common cause of allergies
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18 IgE Function Provides protection from large parasites Initiates an inflammatory reaction to attract eosinophils When produced against innocuous environmental antigens, they are a common cause of allergies Fc portions of IgEs are bound to mast cells
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19 Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Most abundant class (80%-85%) Accounts for most of the protective activity against infections Transported across the placenta Four classes: IgG1 IgG2 IgG3 IgG4
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20 Immunoglobulin M (IgM) Largest of the immunoglobulins Pentamer stabilized by a J chain – don’t worry about this, just know its large First antibody produced during the primary response to an antigen Synthesized during fetal life IgG and IgM synthesized in utero
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21 Secretory (Mucosal) Immune System Lymphoid tissues that protect the external surfaces of the body Antibodies present in tears, sweat, saliva, mucus, and breast milk IgA is the dominant immunoglobulin Small numbers of IgG and IgM are present
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22 Cellular Immunity T lymphocytes: T Cytotoxic (Tc) cells T Helper (Th) cells Memory cells
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23 Adaptive Immunity Clonal diversity Production of T and B lymphocytes Antigen recognition Lymphocyte specificity Clonal selection Antigen processing and presentation Complex cellular interactions
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24 Generation of Clonal Diversity All necessary receptor specificities are produced Takes place in the primary (central) lymphoid organs (thymus, bone marrow) Results in immature but immunocompetent T and B cells Primarily occurs in the fetus
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25 Clonal Diversity B Cell Development: Production, proliferation, differentiation in bone marrow Travel to lymphoid tissue and reside there as immunocompetent cells Each cell responds to only one specific antigen
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26 Clonal Diversity (cont’d) T Cell Development: The thymus is the central lymphoid organ of T cell development Development of antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) Leave thymus, travel to and reside in lymphoid tissue as mature immunocompetent cells
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27 Clonal Selection: Antigen Processing and Presentation Initiated when T and B cells interact with an antigen Must first be processed and then presented by antigen- processing (antigen-presenting) cells (APCs) Results: Differentiation of B cells into active antibody-producing cells (plasma cells) Differentiation of T cells into effector cells, such as Tcytotoxic cells
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28 Clonal Selection: Antigen Processing and Presentation (cont’d) For processing and presentation to occur, the antigen must be of the appropriate type, the lymphocytes must be prepared to recognize the presented antigen, and the antigen must be presented appropriately
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  • Spring '14
  • JenniferD.Stewart-Glenn
  • cells

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