Throughput Most significant factor in choosing transmission method Causes of

Throughput most significant factor in choosing

This preview shows page 39 - 50 out of 78 pages.

Throughput Most significant factor in choosing transmission method Causes of throughput limitations Laws of physics Signaling and multiplexing techniques Noise Devices connected to transmission medium Fiber-optic cables allow faster throughput Compared to copper or wireless connections N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 39
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Cost Precise costs difficult to pinpoint Media cost dependencies Existing hardware, network size, labor costs Variables influencing final cost Installation cost New infrastructure cost versus reuse Maintenance and support costs Cost of lower transmission rate affecting productivity N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 40
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Noise Immunity Noise distorts data signals Distortion rate dependent upon transmission media Fiber-optic: least susceptible to noise Limit noise impact on network Cable installation Far away from powerful electromagnetic forces Select media protecting signal from noise Antinoise algorithms N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 41
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Size and Scalability Three specifications Maximum nodes per segment Maximum segment length Maximum network length Maximum nodes per segment dependency Attenuation and latency Maximum segment length dependency Attenuation and latency plus segment type N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 42
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Size and Scalability (cont’d.) Segment types Populated: contains end nodes Unpopulated: no end nodes Also called link segment Segment length limitation After certain distance, signal loses strength Cannot be accurately interpreted N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 43
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Connectors and Media Converters Connectors Hardware connecting wire to network device Specific to particular media type Affect costs Installing and maintaining network Ease of adding new segments or nodes Technical expertise required to maintain network Media converter Hardware enabling networks or segments N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 44
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N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 45 Courtesy of Omnitron Systems Technology Figure 3-15 Copper wire-to-fiber media converter
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Coaxial Cable Central metal core (often copper) surrounded by: Insulator Braided metal shielding (braiding or shield) Outer cover (sheath or jacket) N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 46 Figure 3-16 Coaxial cable Courtesy Course Technology/Cengage Learning
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Coaxial Cable (cont’d.) High noise resistance Advantage over twisted pair cabling Carry signals farther before amplifier required Disadvantage over twisted pair cabling More expensive Hundreds of specifications RG specification number Differences: shielding and conducting cores Transmission characteristics N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 47
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Coaxial Cable (cont’d.) Conducting core American Wire Gauge (AWG) size Larger AWG size, smaller wire diameter Data networks usage RG-6 RG-8 RG-58 RG-59 N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 48
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N e w o k + G ui d e o s, 6 h E 49 Courtesy of MCM Electronics, Inc.
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