It was no accident that Xi when he assumed power declared that his main

It was no accident that xi when he assumed power

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It was no accident that Xi, when he assumed power, declared that his main objective was to bring about the “ great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation .” That slogan was an attempt to position Xi’s leadership within the arc of a larger narrative that portrays the party as responsible for restoring China’s historic place in the world. In December 2015, the Communist Party Central Committee held a group study of Chinese patriotism and Xi himself call ed for further “promoting patriotism to achieve the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation .”32 By connecting patriotism to Xi’s mission to restore Chinese greatness, that link is being made even more concrete. Although these themes have long been an important part of Chinese politics, Xi will choose to strengthen them in coming years. By stoking Chinese nationalism, Xi will seek to protect himself and the party from the worst of the economic downturn. His control over policymaking will be an advantage in that effort, and his policies will reflect and support his domestic political agenda. Xi taking hard line on US now, shift signals weakness and undermines his political base of support Buckley, 14 (Chris, “Xi Jinping’s Rapid Rise in China Presents Challenges to the U.S.,” pg online at - empower-china.html?_r=0 //um-ef) President Xi Jinping has amassed power faster than any Chinese leader in decades , and his officials have cast his talks with Mr. Obama and other regional leaders this week in Beijing as another affirmation of the ascendance of China and of Mr. Xi. For over 20 years, the Chinese Communist Party elite largely made decisions by consensus, seeking to avoid a repeat of the turbulence under Mao and Deng Xiaoping. But less than two years after assuming power , Mr. Xi has emerged as more than the “first among equals” in the ruling Politburo Standing Committee , shaking the longstanding assumption that China would be steered by steady, if often ponderous, collective leadership. The implications of his rise for the U nited S tates, and for Mr. Obama , are two-sided. When the two leaders meet, Mr. Obama may have a surer sense that his counterpart has the power to make good on his promises. On Wednesday, they unveiled a deal on curbing greenhouse gases, including a landmark agreement by China to reach a peak in carbon dioxide emissions by about 2030. On Tuesday, China also said it would eliminate tariffs on many information technology products. But so much now depends on Mr. Xi’s political calculations , and he has shown himself to be wary of the West and disinclined to make concessions under pressure . “Xi portrays himself in some ways not un like Putin ,” said Dali Yang, a political science professor at the University of Chicago. “He’s basically saying that ‘I am here to defend the party, to defend the national interests in terms of national territorial sovereignty.’ ” Signs of Mr. Xi’s ascendancy are everywhere, from the collections of his speeches selling in bookstores
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