semantic memory its possible to have a deficit in semantic but not episodic

Semantic memory its possible to have a deficit in

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semantic memoryit’s possible to have a deficit in semantic but not episodic memory (dueto brain damage)associative deficit hypothesis: thought to be an explanation of memorydegradation in older people, deficiency in both creating and maintaining linksbetween information units (e.g. not being able to pair a name with a face), only affects explicit memoryKorsakoff’s syndrome: a kind of amnesia resulting from brain atrophy because of a thiamine deficiency, thought to be a kind of disconnection syndrome, which means that implicit learning can take place but there’s no awareness of learning having taken place, also characterized by emotionally flatness and an unawareness of any memory deficitAlzheimer’s disease: characterized not by retrieval failure but a loss of information that was once thereprospective memory: memory system that deals with events that will happen in the futureerrorless learning: the most effective way of teaching amnesics new skills by not allowing them to commit errors, which maximizes on their implicit learning skillsmethod of vanishing cues: method of removing cues slowly until the amnesic is capable of naming a word when given its definition without any cues, relies on not having to generalize to contexts very disparate from the original context of learningcryptomnesia: unintended plagiarism resulting from the failure to recognize something as being familiardissociative memory disorders: can arise when a part of someone’s personality becomes dissociated due to a traumatizing event without any brain damagepsychogenic amnesia: can’t recall personal memories, temporarypsychogenic fugue: psychogenic amnesia with an ensuing flight to live as someone else, the person can’t remember the fugue episodeonce they recover from the amnesiadissociative identity disorder: no explicit memory transfer between alters, but implicit memory transfer can occur
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childhood amnesia: the incapacity to remember events from before a certain age, usually three or four, thought to be due to differing memory schemas in children that could prevent retrieval, as well as encoding by general schemasinstead of by individual memories, and possibly the lack of language to organize the information Chapter 7 Paivio’s dual-coding theory: theory that there are two separate systems (verbal and non-verbal) that code events logogens: units of the verbal coding system, information lying behind our use of a word, relies more on the left hemisphere imagens: units of the non-verbal coding system, images that represent concepts, relies more on the right hemisphere concreteness: the degree to which a word refers to a concept that can be experienced through the senses, highly correlated with the degree of imagery associated with a concept concrete words are coded by the verbal and non-verbal systems, and are therefore easier to learn than abstract words, which are only coded by the verbal system concrete and abstract words are processed differently by the two
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