This policy change would include education of mother and other care givers one

This policy change would include education of mother

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assessment for a minimum of two hours post-delivery. This policy change would include education of mother and other care givers, one to one nursing ratio during this time period, and implementing the RAPP assessment tool as a competency with each delivery, with hopes to have it added to the EMR within one year. This change will involve making staff familiar with the RAPP tool, as well as education on sudden unexpected postnatal collapse.
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POLICY 13 Evaluation Plan Measurable Outcomes Method and Tools for Measuring Responsibility Timelines Approval by nursing best practice and go live date set Constant contact between policy creators and physicians with policy creation Stephanie Nicholson, BSN Kara Schroeder, BSN Kellie Bush, RN 30-45 days All staff are able to perform RAPP assessment as well as perform teach- back of SUPC Creation of RAPP assessment tool and PP presentation on SUPC. April Whalen, RN 30 days post approval from nursing best practice committee New policy found to be successful and RAPP assessment added to EMR for easier completion Documented decrease in SUPC and/or near miss SUPC as evidenced by RAPP assessment tools Stephanie Nicholson, BSN April Whalen, RN Approximately one year from go live date. Included in this EBP project will be found the proposed skin to skin policy as well as the RAPP assessment tool as adopted from the article, Infant Assessment and Reduction of Sudden Unexpected Postnatal Collapse Risk During Skin-to-Skin Contact.
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POLICY 14 REID HEALTH FAMILY BIRTHING CENTER Page ___ SKIN-TO-SKIN CARE PURPOSE To provide guidelines to promote and provide safe skin-to-skin care while reducing the risk for Sudden Unexpected Postnatal Collapse (SUPC) and aligning with the facility’s infant feeding policy. GENERAL INFORMATION 1. Skin-to-skin care is defined as the practice of placing infants in direct contact with their mothers or other caregivers with the ventral skin of the infant facing and touching the ventral skin of the mother/ caregiver (bared skinned, chest-to-chest). 2. Skin-to-skin care is also a term used to describe continued holding of the infant in the manner described above beyond the immediate delivery period and lasting throughout infancy, whenever the mother/ caregiver and infant have the opportunity. 3. Skin-to-Skin care is recommended for all mothers and newborns, regardless of feeding or delivery method, immediately after birth (as soon as the mother is medically stable, awake, and able to respond to her newborn) and to continue for at least 1 hour, as defined by the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) “Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding.” 4. Skin-to-skin care has been researched extensively as a method to provide improved physiologic stability for newborns and potential benefits for mothers. Skin-to-skin care immediately after birth stabilizes the newborn body temperature and can help prevent hypothermia. Skin-to-skin care also helps stabilize blood glucose concentrations, decreases crying, and provides cardiorespiratory stability, especially in late preterm newborns. Skin-to-skin care has been shown
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