Interaction justice exchange conflict management team

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Interaction: Justice Exchange Conflict management
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Team Dynamics Common sources of interpersonal conflict: The “boss” - the self-appointed leader whom other team members do not want to follow. The “free rider” - the member who won’t pull his/her own weight, but benefits from the products of the team. The “jerk” - the member who constantly makes other team members angry or upset by insensitive behavior. The “know-it-all” - the member who seems to think s/he has all the answers and doesn’t much care what others on the team may think or know. The “loser” - the member who just never seems to get with the program the way other team members do, and as a result constantly causes more trouble than value.
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Team Dynamics Healthy Conflict: Genuine differences of opinion based on arguable facts or perceptions, worked out in a civil discussion based on mutual respect and a shared desire to do the right thing. It is always permissible for a team member to insist on clarification of others’ ideas and to insist on the right to work at explaining his/her own ideas until everyone understands. Assumes that sometimes consensus is not always possible, but a decision must be made.
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Team Dynamics Unhealthy Conflict: Flights over power and domination, whether or not played out on the grounds of fact and perception. Group progress is sacrificed for the need of one or more individuals to get personal gain. Arguments that arise simply for the sake of argument, not leading to clarification and/or resolution of the issues.
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Team Dynamics DO: Nurture a climate in which conflict is expected and OK. Constantly return to your cooperative goals. Actively show intent and effort to understand others. Ask others to show that they understand you. Look for and work on underlying problems such as dysfunctional personal behavior, power grabbing, etc. Confront problems when they arise and do not let them be “smoothed over.” Celebrate joint success.
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Team Dynamics DO NOT: Blame others for the problems the group encounters. Prove that you are right and others are wrong. Make other team members look weak or incompetent. Hold out for solutions that only benefit you. Brag that you have outwitted others on the team. “Smooth over” problems that arise rather than confronting them and dealing with them proactively.
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The smart individual in a world of teams Teams are here to stay, but they are not ideal for every task. They can cause trouble for individuals if not managed correctly. Conflicts over leadership and free riders are the most serious problems for individuals. Watch for this and try to be sure it doesn’t happen in a way that hurts you. Be proactive. It is very difficult to assess individual contribution in teams, but nevertheless it must be done. Know how your own performance will be evaluated and watch carefully.
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The smart individual in a world of teams When possible, negotiate rewards for the team that you can share in if the team does an extraordinarily good job.
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