A valuable tool in organizing training is to identify and classify training

A valuable tool in organizing training is to identify

This preview shows page 96 - 99 out of 222 pages.

A valuable tool in organizing training is to identify and classify training sessions into high, medium, and low intensity days. Doing this will better allow you to manage and manipulate your training frequency and build more recovery into your training as intensity increases. The primary stressors I manipulate for the training of my football players are - Sprints (this includes all maximum speed movement drills) - Jumps - Throws - Squat variations - Bench variations The secondary training includes - Aerobic capacity training - Assistance lifting
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Juggernaut Training A Thoughtful Pursuit Of Strength P 97 Our offseason periods of training are divided into three main blocks of training in which the training schedule is consolidated to varying degrees. Those periods are work capacity, alactic power, and alactic capacity. Over the course of these three periods, training moves from more frequent and lower intensity training of the primary stressors and less specific training toward less frequent and higher intensity training of the primary stressors and more specific exercise selections. Let’s take a look block-by-block. WORK CAPACITY This first block of the off-season training process is focused on building work capacity through frequent, high volume, moderate intensity relatively general training means. Frequency during this period is high, with six weekly training sessions all featuring a few of the primary training means. Because of the frequent nature of training at this point, total volume is inherently high. With high frequency and high volume training, intensity must be kept down to avoid overtraining. There are several factors to consider with managing training intensity during this period of the year. First, the athletes are coming out of their season, so they are likely detrained to some degree in regards to strength, power, and speed; this will inherently reduce the intensity of their training. For example, if an athlete who previously ran a 4.6 40-yard dash, benched 315, and squatted 455 comes out of the season running   a 4.75, benching 295, and squatting 405, then even his maximum output at the moment won’t be as stressful because it is less than they have achieved before. Managing intensity of weightroom
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Juggernaut Training A Thoughtful Pursuit Of Strength P 98 movements is as simple as assigning percentages to the lifts. Most of the work in this period is done in the 55-75% range. Managing intensity for sprint training, jumps, and throws requires a bit more creativity though. Explosive training like sprints, jumps, and throws need to be trained at at least 90% intensity to have the desired effect, but frequent training of maximal speed and power qualities is very stressful to the body and nervous systems. We can solve this problem by choosing exercises that allow the athlete to perform 90%+ intensity work but reduce the maximum output capabilities and save the athletes from over-stressing themselves. For example, during this period, we will utilize more sled
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