The realm of death the speaker is satirically curious

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the realm of death, the speaker is satirically curious about a lack of vitality in its residents and caretakers, for she had expected to find miraculous resurrection.
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Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems 99 QUESTIONS FOR REVIEW AND WRITING 1. Why is a good general knowledge of Emily Dickinson’s life useful for interpreting her poems? 2. How can knowledge of Emily Dickinson’s life be misused in interpreting her poems? 3. Compare and contrast “We play at Paste” (320) and “Essential Oils—are wrung” (675). 4. Discuss the use of abstractions as vivid metaphors in I dwell in Possibility” (657). 5. Compare and contrast the use of animals as symbols in Dickinson’s love poems. 6. Discuss the relationship between deprivation and fulfillment in Dickinson’s love poems. 7. Compare and contrast Dickinson’s joyful and melancholy responses to nature. 8. Discuss the use of metaphors in Dickinson’s nature scenes. 9. Discuss Dickinson’s various tones, from ecstatic to anguished, in showing how rebirth can come from suffering. 10. Discuss the figure of the speaker as a little girl in Dickinson’s poems. 11. Offer detailed arguments for the varying interpretations of “Because I could not stop for Death” (712). 12. Compare and contrast the changes of mood dramatized in “This world is not Conclusion” (501) and I know that He exists” (338). 13. Discuss the figure of death as a lover in Dickinson’s poems. 14. Compare and contrast Dickinson’s first-person and third-person death scenes. 15. Discuss in detail your reasons for disagreeing with any whole interpretation of a poem made in these Notes.
Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems 100 SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY ANDERSON, CHARLES R. Emily Dickinson’s Poetry: Stairway of Surprise. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1960. Careful analysis of over one hundred poems. BLAKE, CAESAR R. AND CARLTON F. WELLS, EDS. The Recognition of Emily Dickinson: Selected Criticism Since 1890. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1964. Collection of critical reviews, essays, and excerpts from books, arranged chronologically. Especially valuable for early critical views of Dickinson. CHASE, RICHARD. Emily Dickinson. New York: William Sloane Associates, 1951. Competent critical biography based on pre-Johnson texts. Very qualified admiration for poems. CODY, JOHN. After Great Pain: The Inner Life of Emily Dickinson. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1971. Highly speculative psychoanalytic study interrelating life and poems. DAVIS, THOMAS F., ED. 14 By Dickinson. Chicago: Scott, Foresman, 1964. Collection of explications of fourteen well known poems. GELPI, ALBERT J. Emily Dickinson: The Mind of the Poet. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1965. Excellent study of Dickinson’s major ideas, their sources, and interrelations. GRIFFITH, CLARK. The Long Shadow: Emily Dickinson’s Tragic Poetry. Princeton University Press, 1964. Largely psychological treatment of Dickinson’s most anguished poems as her greatest accomplishment. Exaggerates her skepticism.

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