Today the sole purpose for the exclusionary clause is

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 5 pages.

amendment rights protecting citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures. Today, the sole purpose for the exclusionary clause is to prevent police misconduct. The good faith exception is an exception to the exclusionary rule banning evidence acquired from illegal searches. If an officer believes that they have reasonably good faith that they were acting with legal authority, “such as by relying on a search warrant that is later found to have been legally defective, the illegally seized evidence is admissible under this rule” (Cornell Law) Arizona v. Evans is a case that shows the good faith exception in play. In this case, officers relied on a search warrant that ended up being invalid. Another case Illinois v. Krull , it was determined that evidence is admissible even if the warrant ended up being invalid, if at the time of the search it was believed to be valid. One instance in where the good faith exception is seen the most is when police employees have made errors in maintenance of warrant databases,
3 Good Faith Exception and the Exclusionary Rule

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture