Pig bristles consist primarily of keratin 90 or more an insoluble protein

Pig bristles consist primarily of keratin 90 or more

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Pig bristles consist primarily of keratin (90% or more), an insoluble protein packed with cross-linked fibres by disulfide bonds. Keratin is known for its high mechanical stability, insolubility and recalcitrance to degradation by common proteolytic enzymes such as trypsin, pepsin and papain [2]. The traditional technology for degradation of raw pig bristles is based on long-term heating, alkaline hydrolysis or treatment with high pressure and heat (6 bars, 150°C for at least 20 min.). Unfortunately, the process also destroys components with high biological value, primarily amino acids [3]. The form and the duration of the process determine whether you choose increasing digestibility or reduced amino acid content. The digestibility of bristle meal is approximately 30% [4]. The potential of novel technology for efficient conversion of low value bio-residues from pig bristles into high value nutritionally beneficial bio- products will be investigated. Action of microbes will be the innovative biotechnological tool to devise new technological methods for efficient bioconversion of keratin. Optimal enzyme production by fungal and bacterial solutions from nature will aid to improve resource efficiency when producing eco friendly, high protein content products with improved bioavailability and increased nutritional and economic value. A costly waste problem will be turned into a profitable product, thereby making food production more competitive, sustainable and environmentally friendly.
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62 nd International Congress of Meat Science and Technology, 14-19 th August 2016, Bangkok, Thailand II. MATERIALS AND METHODS Keratin waste material collection and preparation Raw bristles and hooves were collected from a Danish slaughterhouse. Bristles and hooves were removed from the pig at the slaughterhouse immediately after sticking. Before milling, the pig bristles were soaked in warm water with hand soap for 1 hour. Then they were rinsed three times with lukewarm water. The precipitate was separated, and finally the bristles were dried at 60°C overnight. Preparing the bristles meal was carried out by grinding the bristles with the Planetary Ball Mill PM 100 [5] in a 125 ml grinding jar with 7x20mm milling balls, made of stainless steel (revolution speed 500 rpm for 20 minutes). Growth conditions: Microcosms The microcosm incubation was performed in glass bottles containing a minimum liquid media supplemented with pigs ’ bristles and hooves as the sole nutrient source. The microcosm’s medium consisted of: 10 g/l of milled bristles and hooves, 2 mM potassium phosphate buffer at pH 7.5, 1 mM MgSO 4 and 10 ml/l of a trace element solution
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  • Fall '08
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  • Enzyme, Keratin, Protease, bristles, International Congress of Meat Science and Technology

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