Congress also refused to make lynching a federal

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Congress also refused to make lynching a federal crime or outlaw the poll tax that reduced the access of poor Americans to the ballot box. Congress also rejected a bill that would have made Roosevelt²s Fair Employment Practices Committee, which prohibited racial discrimination by companies doing business with the federal government, permanent. At the same time, they passed many conservative pieces of legislation. For example, the Taft-Hartley Act, which limited the power of unions, became law despite Truman²s veto. 28.2 The Cold War By the end of this section, you will be able to: ¥ Explain how and why the Cold War emerged in the wake of World War II ¥ Describe the steps taken by the U.S. government to oppose Communist expansion in Europe and Asia ¥ Discuss the government²s efforts to root out Communist influences in the United States As World War II drew to a close, the alliance that had made the United States and the Soviet Union partners in their defeat of the Axis powers³Germany, Italy, and Japan³began to fall apart. Both sides realized that their visions for the future of Europe and the world were incompatible. Joseph Stalin, the Click and Explore Chapter 28 Post-War Prosperity and Cold War Fears, 1945-1960 833
premier of the Soviet Union, wished to retain hold of Eastern Europe and establish Communist, pro- Soviet governments there, in an effort to both expand Soviet influence and protect the Soviet Union from future invasions. He also sought to bring Communist revolution to Asia and to developing nations elsewhere in the world. The United States wanted to expand its influence as well by protecting or installing democratic governments throughout the world. It sought to combat the influence of the Soviet Union by forming alliances with Asian, African, and Latin American nations, and by helping these countries to establish or expand prosperous, free-market economies. The end of the war left the industrialized nations of Europe and Asia physically devastated and economically exhausted by years of invasion, battle, and bombardment. With Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and China reduced to shadows of their former selves, the United States and the Soviet Union emerged as the last two superpowers and quickly found themselves locked in a contest for military, economic, social, technological, and ideological supremacy. FROM ISOLATIONISM TO ENGAGEMENT The United States had a long history of avoiding foreign alliances that might require the commitment of its troops abroad. However, in accepting the realities of the post-World War II world, in which traditional powers like Great Britain or France were no longer strong enough to police the globe, the United States realized that it would have to make a permanent change in its foreign policy, shifting from relative isolation to active engagement.

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