ences in satisfaction exist among shopping orientation segments when evaluating

Ences in satisfaction exist among shopping

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ences in satisfaction exist among shopping orientation segments when evaluating internet shopping site performance. This study will provide a better understanding of internet consumers and their behaviour in the market- place. Specifically, there is a need to evaluate the influence of the internet shopping environment on consumer behaviour. The internet shopping environ- ment communicates image through product and site offerings and often influences consumers’ satisfaction. Furthermore, the need for research involving shopping orientation results from differences between consum- ers. If all consumers were the same there would be no need for segmentation nor different products and ser- vices because all stimuli could be identical. From a retailer’s perspective, a study such as this is helpful in identifying strategies to satisfy internet consumers based on their opinions and feelings about shopping. More importantly, it will identify specific target mar- kets for which product offerings and services may be differentiated.
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© 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd International Journal of Consumer Studies, 28 , 3, June 2004, pp268–283 269 L.N. McKinney Creating a satisfying internet shopping experience Framework of the study Turley and Milliman 3 proposed a stimulus-organism- response (S-O-R) framework for examining the affects of store atmosphere on shopper behaviour. The frame- work showed that atmospheric variables act as a stimu- lus for both employees and customers (organisms), which causes them to react (response). The stimuli were categorized into five distinct segments: external vari- ables, general interior variables, layout and design vari- ables, point-of-purchase and decoration variables, and human variables. Stimuli Retail organizations examine the needs and preferences of their target markets to tailor the retail environment. They use several atmospheric variables to communicate image to shopper segments or target markets. These variables are defined as stimuli, which result in a num- ber of responses including enjoyment, purchase, and satisfaction. 3 Atmospheric variables have been catego- rized in the store and non-store literature. For example, a recent study by Eroglu, Machleit, and Davis 4 suggests categorizing online atmospheric variables in two ways, high task relevant and low task relevant. High task rel- evant is defined as those cues that facilitate shopping and enable consumers to achieve their goal. Some examples include descriptions of merchandise, price, terms of sale, delivery and return polices, and pictures of merchandise. Low task relevant atmospheric cues include site information not relevant to the shopping task, such as colours, borders, background patterns, typestyles and fonts, animation, music, and decorative pictures. Another example, from a retail store perspec- tive, suggests a more comprehensive view atmospheric categories. 3 The present study proposes adapting the atmospheric categories discussed by Turley and Milli- man. Furthermore, it differs from Eroglu et al. 4 and adds
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