His concern is broader and deeper than that his

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His concern is broader and deeper than that.His concern is ultimately the Enlightenmentassertion of the self and the turn to the subjectand the kind of human being that envisions: anagent that gains knowledge of the world andfreely chooses to do good.(C) NB Immanuel Kant, The Conflict of the Faculties,(1798): “Philosophy is not some sort of scienceof representations, concepts, and ideas, or ascience of all sciences, or anything else of thissort; rather, it is a science of the human being,of its representing, thinking, and acting—itshould present the human being in all of itscomponents, as it is and ought to be, that is, inaccordance with its natural determinations aswell as its relationship of morality andfreedom. Ancient philosophy adopted anentirely inappropriate standpoint towards thehuman being in the world, for it made it into amachine in it, which as such had to be entirelydependent on the world or on external thingsand circumstances; it thus made the humanbeing into an all but merely passive part of theworld. Now the critique of reason hasappeared and determined the human being to athoroughly active place in the world. Thehuman being itself is the original creator of all
THEO 1001 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN THEOLOGYInstructor: Dr. D. Lyle DabneyLecture 03.3 (Hume, Rousseau, Kant) - TThPage 14its representations and concepts and ought tobe the sole author of all its actions.” (AkademieAusgabe, 7: 69-70)ii. Concerns(A) Kant’s work is marked by a deep conviction ofthe uniqueness, the significance, and thedignity of the human person. From 1755 onhe lectured on anthropology every year inwhat were the first academic courses on thatsubject ever offered in a German university.(B) The issues that he believed to be central tohuman dignity, the issues that had realexistential import for his own life, areindicated in a remark found at the end of hisCritique of Practical Reason: “Two things fillthe mind with ever new and increasingadmiration and awe, the more often andsteadily reflection is occupied with them: thestarry heaven above me and the moral lawwithin me. Neither of them need I seek andmerely suspect as if shrouded in obscurity orrapture beyond my own horizon; I see thembefore me and connect them immediately withmy existence.” (Kant,Akademie Ausgabe,5:161-2)(C) Science and morality represented human dignityfor Kant, the human as the autonomoussubject of knowledge and autonomous moralagent.iii. Turning Point(A) Kant spent the first half of his academic careerconcentrating mostly on issues in science, butfrom his appointment as a professor in 1770until his death he turned his entire attention tophilosophy. Why?(B) Kant said that it was reading Hume that “awokeme from my dogmatic slumbers.” Bothscience and morality were called into questionby Hume’s insistence on ‘instinct,’ and forKant that means that human dignity is calledinto question as well.

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