This Adam on page 176 is very different from the Adam at the beginning of the

This adam on page 176 is very different from the adam

This preview shows page 8 - 11 out of 14 pages.

This Adam on page 176 is very different from the Adam at the beginning of the book where Adam did not highly respect his father. Adam is admitting that he has become a man. The Reverend told him this too, on page 198. “I am not one of those who might regard you as a boy. You lived a man’s life today and you did a man’s work.” 11 Adam, since he lived a man’s life and did a man’s work, was ready to be a fully loyal man to his soon-to-be-country, his mother, and his future wife. Ruth Simmons asked him on page 200 if he loved her, and he thoughtfully said, “Yes” 12 . The fact that Adam 7
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thought about his answer before saying ‘yes’ displays his love and loyalty for Ruth, as well as his overall maturity. On page 202, just after Adam’s and Ruth’s dialogue, we read the very last paragraph of the very last page, which says, ‘In my bed, with the covers drawn up close around me, I closed my eyes and whispered a prayer. Not the same prayer as all the other nights. I said, “Thank you, God, that today is over.” Then, falling asleep I said farewell to a childhood, a world, a secure and sun-warmed existence and past that was over and done with and gone away for all time.’ 13 Adam Cooper grew up into a man. He was still fifteen years old, but age doesn’t matter; Adam showed it took responsible choices, loyalty to his family and friends, and courage to make it through battle. Now that we are assured of what the theme is and what it means, we now need to know how the theme holds up with Scripture. If the theme is in anyway unbiblical, we shall declare it as such. Conversely, if we find it to be biblical through and through, we shall declare it to be as such. Part of evaluating the theme with Scripture is to test just how well the theme holds up to reality. If the theme holds true to the Bible, then it is valid for reality. The theme describes to us what it takes to become a man, but it does not directly define who a man is, so we must infer from the theme as to what defines a man. A man, as defined by the book, is also what it takes to become a man, which is loyalty, courage, and love. So now that we know Howard Fast’s definition for a man, what is the Bible’s definition? The short answer is Luke 2:52, which says, “And Jesus grew in wisdom and stature, and in favor with both God and man,” which means that Jesus is the ideal man, and Luke 2:52 also shows us what we need to be like the ideal man. But also, we are to strive to be more Christ-like as seen in Philippians 3:10: “I 8
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want to know Christ—yes, to know the power of his resurrection and participation in his sufferings, becoming like him in his death”. In striving to be more like Christ, we inevitably take on Luke 2:52. But there is more than just Luke 2:52 to describe a Godly man. 1 Timothy 6:11 says, “But you, man of God, flee from all this, and pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, endurance and gentleness.” In addition, Deuteronomy 31:6 says, “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them, for the Lord your God goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you.” So now we have God’s definition of man and also Howard Fast’s definition. God’s
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  • Spring '16
  • Mr. Baldwin
  • Boy, Battles of Lexington and Concord, Lexington, Massachusetts, Adam Cooper

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