Other receivables generally arise from transactions outside the usual operating

Other receivables generally arise from transactions

This preview shows page 34 - 35 out of 116 pages.

Trade receivables are amounts due from customers for merchandise sold or services performed in the ordinary course of business. Other receivables generally arise from transactions outside the usual operating activities of the Group. If collection is expected in one year or less (or in the normal operating cycle of the business if longer), they are classified as current assets. If not, they are presented as non-current assets. Trade and other receivables are recognised initially at fair value. Trade and other receivables are recognised initially at fair value, with the amount of goods and services tax (“GST”) included. The net amount of GST recoverable from the government is presented as GST receivable within other receivables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows are included in the statement of cash flows on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows which are recoverable from, or payable to, the government are classified as operating cash flows. After recognition, trade and other receivables are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less provision for impairment. See accounting policy Note 2.12(d) on impairment of financial assets. 2.17 Non-current assets (or disposal groups) classified as assets held for sale Non-current assets (or disposal groups) are classified as assets held for sale if their carrying amounts will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use. This condition is regarded as met only when the sale is highly probable and the asset is available for immediate sale in its present condition subject only to terms that are usual and customary. Immediately before classification as held for sale, the measurement of the non-current assets is brought up-to-date in accordance with applicable MFRS. Then, on initial classification as held for sale, non-current assets (other than investment properties, deferred tax assets, employee benefits assets, financial assets and inventories) are measured in accordance with MFRS 5 that is at the lower of carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell. Any differences are included in the income statement. 2.18 Inventories Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (determined on the weighted average basis) and net realisable value. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business less the estimated costs of completion and the estimated costs necessary to make the sale. Costs of purchased inventory are determined after deducting rebates, discounts and the amount of goods and services tax (“GST”), except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the government. When the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the government, the GST is recognised as part of the cost of purchased inventory. 2.19 Cash and cash equivalents For the purpose of the statement of cash flows, cash equivalents are held for the purpose of meeting short-term cash commitments rather than for investment or other purposes. Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other short term,
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