For example when studying an argument underline claims We identify claims as

For example when studying an argument underline

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you need to take from the text. For example, when studying an argument, underline “claims.” We identify claims as belief statements that the author is making. You’ll quickly discover that the author makes multiple claims throughout the argument. When studying poetry, underline the imagery you find throughout the poem. Circling specific items is also an effective close reading strategy. I often have my students circle “Key terms” in the text. I define key terms as words that: 1. Are defined. 2. Are repeated throughout the text. 3. If you only circled five key terms in the entire text, you would have a pretty good idea about what the entire text is about. I have also asked students to circle the names of sources, power verbs, or figurative language. Providing students with a specific thing you want them to underline or circle will focus their attention on that area much better than “underlining important information”. 4. Left margin: What is the author SAYING? It isn’t enough to “write in the margins”. We must be very specific and give students a game plan for what they will write. This is where the
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