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However that doesnt show us that he accepts it

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this point. However, that doesn’t show us that he accepts it. Generally, we would expect Brad to have difficulty accepting this sort of claim. However, Al does argue for it, as the second premise gives it some support. Thus, the premise is acceptable. See pp. 52–56. 3. b) No. In order to be deductively valid, it must be impossible for the conclusion to be false and the premises true. For this argument, all the premises could be true, and yet the conclusion (“That is more than enough reason to fire you”) does not have to be. See pp. 60– 61. 4. a) Yes. Premises are relevant to the conclusion if they make it more likely to be true. In this case, the two premises are relevant to the conclusion (“That is more than enough reason to fire you”), as they do serve to make it more likely. Premises are sufficient for the conclusion if, given the nature of the conclusion, they provide enough evidence. In this case, more evidence seems necessary. There are other, milder punishments that might also be appropriate. Those would need to be considered and rejected for the reasons here to be sufficient. Therefore, this argument is a moderately strong non-deductive argument. See pp. 62–64. 5. a) Yes. An argument is contextually relevant if it fits within the context established by previous conservation or dialectic. This argument is responding directly to Brad’s previous argument, and thus is contextually relevant. See pp. 65–71. Passage 4 1. a) Yes. A premise is acceptable if the arguer does not have to bear the burden of proof, or, if the arguer does, then they do so successfully. In this case, it seems likely that Cornelius is
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Good Reasoning Matters! A Constructive Approach to Critical Thinking , Fifth Edition © Oxford University Press Canada, 2012 saying something that he and Dorothea already know to be true. This implies that the premise does not need to be proven for this particular audience, so it is acceptable. See pp. 52–56. 2. b) No. A premise is acceptable if the arguer does not have to bear the burden of proof, or, if the arguer does, then they do so successfully. In this case, Cornelius bears the burden of proof. It’s not clear, given the information provided, that Dorothea would be inclined to believe this. Indeed, she might be inclined to dispute it. Cornelius provides no argument for this claim, so he fails to bear the burden of proof. Thus, it is unacceptable. See pp. 52–56. 3. b) No. A premise is acceptable if the arguer does not have to bear the burden of proof, or, if the arguer does, then they do so successfully. In this case, Cornelius bears the burden of proof. It’s not clear, given the information provided, that Dorothea would be inclined to believe this. Indeed, she might be inclined to dispute it. Cornelius provides no argument for this claim, so he fails to bear the burden of proof. Thus, it is unacceptable. See pp. 52–56.
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