When you see the word autonomic prior to nervous

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When you see the word “autonomic” prior to nervous system, think of the similar word “automatic,” because the autonomic nervous system controls behaviours that occur automatically, that is, outside of our conscious awareness.
19. Draw a neuron and label it. Be sure to include dendrites, a soma, an axon with axon terminals, synaptic cleft, and at least two places where you would expect there to be synapses. 20. A neuron receives both GABA (an inhibitory neurotransmitter) and Glutamate (an excitatory neurotransmitter) at the same time. The neuron changes its polarity and reaches the threshold for an action potential. Which neurotransmitter did the neuron receive more of, and how do you know?
21. Describe the various stages that a neuron goes through when it receives excitatory neurotransmitters, and when it receives inhibitory neurotransmitters. You should be able to use the following terms accurately in your description: polarized, resting potential, action potential threshold, depolarize, repolarize, hyperpolarize, absolute refractory period, and relative refractory period.
Excitatory - the neuron becomes depolarized, causing the neuron to reach the potential threshold & fire. once it has fired, the neuron goes through an absolute refractory period, where it can't fire anymore therefore becoming hyperpolarized. The neuron then is in the relative refractory period meaning it could fire, but it would take a lot more. But then it resets back to it's resting potential. Inhibitory - the neuron becomes hyper polarized, & is unable to fire since it has't reached the potential threshold level. Neurotransmitters Different neurotransmitters are different messengers, each with a slightly different thing to say. Some excite the nervous system, increasing its activity, whereas others inhibit the nervous system, decreasing its activity. Some play a role in movement, others in pain perception, and still others in thinking and emotion Neurons exhibit excitatory and inhibitory responses to inputs from other neurons. When excitation is strong enough, the neuron generates an action potential, which travels all the way down the axon to the axon terminal. Charged particles crossing the neuronal membrane are responsible for these events. Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that neurons use to communicate with each other or to cause muscle contraction. The axon terminal releases neurotransmitters at the synapse. This process produces excitatory or inhibitory responses in the receiving neuron.

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