The Charter contains common principles and strategies urban development policy

The charter contains common principles and strategies

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The Charter contains common principles and strategies urban development policy, such as: maintaining a compact settlement structure as an important basis for effective and sustainable use of resources, creating and providing high quality public spaces, improving the quality of life of residents, modernization of infrastructure networks and improvement of energy efficiency, adaptation to threats resulting from climate change, active innovation and education policy, special attention to the poorest districts in the context of the city as a whole, implementation of environmental improvement strategies, strengthening the local economy and local labor market policy, as well as promoting efficient city transport. Leipzig Charter, like the Tractate of Lisbon (2007 - concerning, among others, climate change, security and sustainable development), Declaration from Marseilles (2008 - mainly about the Union for the Mediterranean, including sustainable development) and Declaration from Toledo (2010 - devoted to the strategy of European cities development), they were key international documents, binding sustainability with the development of cities. Another example of a comprehensive approach to the issues of shaping the city, referring to sustainable development, is the concept of Green Urbanism , which Steffen Lehmann [24] formulated in three complex aspects: planning and communication, biodiversity and water, materials and energy. On the basis of the interaction between these aspects, Lehmann distinguished fifteen principles that give an integrated framework of Green Urbanism and serve this way of shaping cities. Green Urbanism is interdisciplinary, hence requires the cooperation of landscape architects, urban planners, environmentalists, transport specialists, physicists, engineers, sociologists, economists and others. According to Lehmann, this is a much more important process than creating compact, multi-purpose, intelligent cities, etc. Another idea of urban development that fits into sustainable development is Smart City , which is an intelligent city. It is a city in which broadly understood modern technologies are used to improve the quality of life of residents and for better functioning of the city as a whole. It operates in a smart economy, based on close cooperation between enterprises, to optimize the exchange of resources, energy and products, but also waste. This aspect is very important in the concept of a smart city, which should be as balanced as possible, self-sufficient and close to a closed circuit. In the literature, the term Smart City is usually assigned the equivalent of “intelligent city”. Such a translation is a big simplification. SMART should be understood as an acronym: S – simple, specific , M – measurable, manageable , A – achievable, ambitious, available , R – reasonable, relevant, realistic , T – timely defined, timeable, tangible [25]. Thus, it is not only about garbage processing, but about skillfully using local possibilities, such as, for example, production of energy and fuels from waste, the use of waste heat from the industry for housing heating, collection and reuse of rainwater and gray, etc.
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