Turgor relates to hydration i tenting is evident in

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Automotive Technology: A Systems Approach
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 6
Automotive Technology: A Systems Approach
Erjavec/Thompson
Expert Verified
Turgor: Relates to hydrationi.Tenting is evident in extreme cases.k.Skin lesions: May be only external evidence of a serious internal injury 6.Haira.Examine by inspection and palpation.b.Note:i.Quantityii.Distributioniii. Texturec.Recent changes in growth or loss of hair can indicate an underlying endocrine disorder or can result from treatment for certain diseases.7.Nailsa.Note:i.Colorii.Shapeiii. Textureiv.Presence or absence of lesionsb.Normal nail should be firm and smooth.i.Normal changes to the nails with aging include:(a)Development of striations(b)Change in colorc.Overly thick nails or nails that have lines running parallel to the finger often suggest a fungal infection.8.Heada.Craniumi.Contains the brainii.Brain connects to the spinal cord through the foramen magnumiii. Occiput(a)The most posterior portion of the craniumiv.Temporal regions(a)On each side of the craniumv.Parietal regions(a)Between the temporal regions and the occiputvi.The frontal region(a)The foreheadvii. A layer of muscle fascia covers the skull.viii.The scalp covers the cranium.ix.Meninges: Three layers of tissue that suspend the brain and spinal cord(a)Dura matter(b) Arachnoid(c)Pia matterx.Cerebrospinal fluid
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Automotive Technology: A Systems Approach
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 6
Automotive Technology: A Systems Approach
Erjavec/Thompson
Expert Verified
(a)Produced in a chamber inside the brain, called the third ventricle(b)Fills the space between the meningesb.Inspect and feel the entire cranium.i.Deformityii.Asymmetry(a)Do not palpate any depressions.iii.Warm, wet areasiv.Tendernessv.Shape and contourvi.Scars or shuntsc.In children younger than 18 months, palpate the anterior fontanelle (the “soft spot”).i.Is usually open and flatii.Bulging(a)Common when crying(b)Pathologic when observed in a quiet childiii. Sunken(a)Indicates dehydrationd.Evaluate the face.i.Colorii.Moistureiii. Expressioniv.Symmetryv.Contourvi.Swelling or apparent areas of injuryvii. DCAP-BTLS(a) Deformities(b) Contusions(c) Abrasions(d) Punctures/penetrations(e) Burns(f) Tenderness(g) Lacerations(h) Swellinge.To correctly assess the head, see Skill Drill 13-4.9.Eyesa.Allow examiner to assess functions of CNS.b.Anterior chamberc.Posterior chamberd.Inspect and palpate the upper and lower orbits, starting at the nose and working toward the lateral edge.e.Ask about:i.Painii.Rednessiii.Loss of visioniv.Diplopiav.Photophobia
vi. Blurringvii. Dischargeviii.Corrective lens usef.Note periorbital ecchymosis (raccoon eyes).g.Assess visual acuity: ability to seei.Snellen (“E”) chart ii.Light/dark discriminationiii.Finger counting(a)Done from a noted distanceh.Assess pupilsi.Normally round and of approximately equal sizeii.In low light, pupils dilateiii.In high light or when a bright light is suddenly introduced, pupils instantly constrict.(a)When light is introduced to one eye, both pupils should constrict equally.

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