Employment equity act 1987 Justice Abella was appointed to oversee the Royal

Employment equity act 1987 justice abella was

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Employment equity act (1987) Justice Abella was appointed to oversee the Royal Commission on Equality in Employment Employment Equity Act was passed by the federal government in 1987 Employers with 100+ employees under federal jurisdiction to develop annual plans setting out goals and timetables Employment equity amendment (1996) As of 1996, employers are responsible for providing reasonable accommodation. Examples include: Providing a sign language interpreter for a job interview with a deaf applicant Altering or grooming codes to allow Aboriginal people to wear braids, etc. Impact of Employment Equity on HR Human resource plans Job descriptions Recruiting Selection Training and development Performance appraisal Compensation program Major Steps: Employment Equity Programs Pay equity Equal pay for work of equal value
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Federally, and in most provinces, laws exist that make it illegal to pay women less than men if their jobs are of equal value Recent cases include: Federal government settled in 1999 at a cost of over $3.5 billion 2011 Supreme Court of Canada ruling involving Canada Post is expected to cost $250 million Reverse discrimination Usually arises when an employer seeks to hire or promote a member of a protected group over an equally (or better) qualified candidate who is not a member of a protected group Places HR departments in difficult position Canadian Human Rights Act declares Employment Equity Programs non-discriminatory if they fulfil the spirit of the law Principles of natural justice Minimum standards of fairness and implied obligations for decision-making Right: To a fair hearing – start asking “what happened?” To a bias-free proceeding To present the opposing argument Of legal representation To timely notice of a hearing To a timely process Other Areas of HR Relevant Laws Canadian Labour Code (1971) Dismissal Hours of work and overtime regulations Minimum wages Occupational health and safety Weekly rest day WHMIS Workplace diversity Includes important human characteristics that influence an employee’s values, perceptions of self and others, behaviours, and interpretations of events Organizational barriers Old boy’s network Informal relationships among male managers and executives Glass ceiling Invisible but real obstructions to career advancement of women and visible minorities Stereotyping Using a few observable characteristics to assign someone to a social category Dimensions of Diversity
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Diversity management Organizations need to hire and promote minorities E.g. Over 6% of Canadians have some form of disability Strategic implications Ensure all rules and policies consider legal aspects Good corporate citizen Training Dismissal linked to behaviour of employees at all levels Make behaviour part of organizational strategy Strategic importance Steps in managing diversity Current industry practices
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