Class_05_(130117)_P1100

Ridicule sarcasm video hyperbole basically means

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Ridicule / Sarcasm Video
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Hyperbole basically means exaggeration or an extravagant overstatement. e.g. “My boss is a fascist dictator. He won’t let anybody do things their own way. It is always his way or the highway.” This kind of statement, considered for exactly what it says, is silly and lacks credibility. Hyperbole
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Interestingly, hyperbole often works even when no one believes it. In this example, we probably don’t believe the statement is actually true, but we would probably be reluctant to take a job working for this guy thinking something like “where there’s smoke, there must be fire.” Be careful: As critical thinkers, we have no more reason to believe the claim that the boss is a problematic one to work for than we do to believe the hyperbole. BREAKING NEWS! Hyperbole
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A proof surrogate is an expression that suggests that there is evidence or authority for a claim without actually citing such evidence of authority. e.g. “informed sources say,” ”it is obvious that” or “studies show” are typical proof surrogates. Proof surrogates are not substitutes for evidence or authority. Proof Surrogates
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The introduction of a proof surrogate does not support an argument. They may suggest sloppy research or even propaganda. The use of proof surrogates, on the other hand, should not be interpreted that evidence does not exist or could not be given. You just don’t know. Proof Surrogates
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N ever drive in a storm without wiper blades.
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& N ever go into the fierce storms of an argument without your WIPER SHIELD to protect you from the evil forms of rhetoric devices: W easeling, I nnuendo, P roof Surrogates E xplanations, Analogies & Definitions (Rhetorical) R idicule/Sarcasm S tereotypes H yperbole I mage Rhetoric E uphemisms/Dysphemisms L oaded Questions, and D ownplaying/Minimizing
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22 This fallacy consists of inflammatory words (or thoughts) followed by a “conclusion” of some sort. According to our text, it substitutes anger for reason or judgment. Increasingly on TV, overt anger is being replaced with a “milder” form of “argument from outrage,” substituting a sense of incredulity (with a generous mix of facial expressions, etc) for overt anger. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2a2-9sPeSoA The fallacy involved is basically the same – suggesting that the “other side” are “ fools” or have a suspicious agenda. The “Argument” From Outrage
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23 The group think fallacy occurs when one is motivated to accept a claim without argument because of membership in a group. An example of this is nationalism – my country right or wrong. “Ron is not guilty of anything. He is a member in good standing of TKE fraternity. He is one of us and we support him.” Emotional Appeals & Not Playing Fair
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24 The relativist fallacy consists in thinking a moral standard of your own group is the “right” way but it doesn’t “apply to everyone.” The
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Ridicule Sarcasm Video Hyperbole basically means...

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