They did not make a crack like the radishes they

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They did not make a crack, like the radishes; they seemed too small and too far apart to push the earth up like that. Margery leaned down and looked with all her eyes at the baby plants. The tiny leaves grew two on a stem, and were almost round. The more she looked at them the more it seemed to Margery that they looked exactly as the radish looked when it first came up. ``Do you suppose,'' Margery said to herself, ``that lettuce and radish look alike? They don't look alike in the market!'' Day by day the lettuce grew, and soon the little round leaves were easier to examine; they certainly were very much like radish leaves. Then, one morning, while she was searching the ground for signs of seeds,
- 162 - Margery discovered the beets. In irregular patches on the row, hints of green were coming. The next day and the next they grew, until the beet leaves were big enough to see. Margery looked. Then she looked again. Then she wrinkled her forehead. ``Can we have made a mistake?'' she thought. ``Do you suppose we can have planted all radishes?'' For those little beet leaves were almost round, and they grew two on a stem, precisely like the lettuce and the radish; except for the size, all three rows looked alike. It was too much for Margery. She ran to the house and found her father. Her little face was so anxious that he thought something unpleasant had happened. ``Papa,'' she said, all out of breath, ``do you think we could have made a mistake about my garden? Do you think we could have put radishes in all the rows?'' Father laughed. ``What makes you think such a thing?'' he asked. ``Papa,'' said Margery, ``the little leaves all look exactly alike! every plant has just two tiny leaves on it, and shaped the same;
- 163 - they are roundish, and grow out of the stem at the same place.'' Papa's eyes began to twinkle. ``Many of the dicotyledonous plants look alike at the beginning,'' he said, with a little drawl on the big word. That was to tease Margery, because she always wanted to know the big words she heard. ``What's `dicotyledonous'?'' said Margery, carefully. ``Wait till I come home to-night, dear,'' said her father, ``and I'll tell you.'' That evening Margery was waiting eagerly for him, when her father finished his supper. Together they went to the garden, and father examined the seedlings carefully. Then he pulled up a little radish plant and a tiny beet. ``These little leaves,'' he said, ``are not the real leaves of the plant; they are only little food-supply leaves, little pockets to hold food for the plant to live on till it gets strong enough to push up into the air. As soon as the real leaves come out and begin to draw food from the air, these little substitutes wither up and fall off. These two lie folded up in the little seed from the be-
- 164 - ginning, and are full of plant food. They don't have to be very special in shape, you see, because they don't stay on the plant after it is grown up.'' ``Then every plant looks like this at first?'' said Margery.

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