Summary 1219 1237 so those are some of the more

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So those are some of the more commonly used display devices. When you're selecting a display device, it's important to know what the primary use of the computer will be. For example, will it be used for video-editing? Graphic editing? Computer gaming? Presentations, and so on? Knowing the primary use of the computer and the characteristics of each display type will help you select the appropriate one. Display devices use a variety of technologies to produce visual information. Because each technology has unique benefits and drawbacks, it is important to understand their differences. The following table describes the most common types of display devices and the technology they use: Display Type Description LCD LCDs (liquid-crystal displays) use liquid crystal technology to display visual information. LCDs are the most common type of display device and range in size from less than an inch to over 10 feet. Modern LCDs use LEDs (light-emitting diodes) to backlight the screen. Edge-Lit White LED (EL-WLED or WLED) displays use white LEDs along one edge (usually the top) of the LCD and a light diffuser to backlight the screen. EL-WLED LCDs are the least expensive, thinnest, and most widely used type of LCD. Full-array WLED displays have an array of white LEDs behind the screen. Full-array WLED LCDs are able to dim specific regions of the screen, resulting in a much higher contrast ratio than LCDs that use EL-WLED technology. RGB-LED displays have an array of special LEDs that are able to emit red, green, and blue light, resulting in superior color accuracy. RGB-LED displays are the most expensive type of backlighting technology. Older LCD monitors, and some LCD HDTVs, use cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs) for backlighting. CCFLs are able to produce better colors than EL-WLED and full-array WLED technologies, but consume a lot more energy and require an internal inverter. LCDs use one of the following panel technologies: TN (twisted nematic) panels are the most common technology used by LCDs. TN panels have very good response times (1–5 ms) and refresh rates (60–144 Hz), so are great for PC gaming. o TN panels have imperfect color reproduction due to the fact that only 6-bits per color can be displayed. They mimic true 24-bit color using dithering and other techniques. o TN panels have poor viewing angles and contrast ratios. IPS (In-plane switching) panels have the best color reproduction quality and viewing angles among LCDs, making them well suited for graphic artists, designers, and photographers. o IPS panels have relatively slow response times (5–16 ms) and refresh rates (60 Hz) and have a slight purple tint in blacks when viewed from a wide angle. o High-end IPS LCDs are very expensive (over $1000).
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