The undersides of the wings are greyish black around

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have black tips. The undersides of the wings are greyish-black around the distal edges, with a smaller area of white along the leading edge. The tail is grey at the base and has a white tip. The bill is bluish-grey with a blackish tip, and the legs and feet are a cream colour. Young birds are mottled pale brown and may take five years to reach adult plumage. A young White-bellied Sea Eagle can be confused with a Wedge-tailed Eagle, but the Wedge-tailed Eagle has a short white tail and strong patterning on the under-wing (Bryant & Jackson 1999). Haliaeetus leucogaster is generally seen singly or in pairs. The nests are very large structures constructed of sticks, often in tall eucalypts on sheltered leeward slopes. Birds will often perch for long periods on branches of live or dead trees near lagoons, rivers and estuaries, and on rocks and in trees along the coast (Donaghey 2003). The birds hunt by a gliding attack from a prominent perch, taking eels, birds and fish from the water’s surface, as well as lizards, small mammals and carrion on land (Bryant & Jackson 1999). Current Status Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 : Marine and Migratory Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 : vulnerable Plate 11. Haliaeetus leucogaster (Photograph: Bill Brown) Figure 10. Haliaeetus leucogaster: known nest sites on King Island King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 158
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Existing Conservation Measures There are no existing conservation measures specifically for Haliaeetus leucogaster on King Island. Distribution and Habitat Haliaeetus leucogaster is distributed along the coastline of mainland Australia and Tasmania including offshore islands (Figure 10). Birds feed and nest mainly near the coast but will also live near large inland rivers and lakes. Large estuaries and convoluted coastlines are the favoured sites for both nesting and foraging. Populations The total population size of Haliaeetus leucogaster in Australia is estimated at more than 500 pairs, although no specific information is available on the size of the Tasmanian subpopulation (Commonwealth Species Profiles and Threats Database 2009). In Tasmania, Haliaeetus leucogaster effectively occurs as a single subpopulation (Threatened Species Section 2006b). However, although the Tasmanian subpopulation is geographically isolated, the species is present on most of the islands of Bass Strait and are believed to have the ability to island-hop between Tasmania and the mainland. Seven or eight breeding pairs and thirteen known nest sites occur on King Island (Donaghey 2003). Habitat critical to the survival of the species Habitat critical to the survival of Haliaeetus leucogaster is defined by nesting habitat (Threatened Species Section 2006). Generally, the species nests in mature forests within 5 km of a large water body, and more rarely on sea cliffs and rock stacks. On offshore islands, Haliaeetus leucogaster occasionally nests in low coastal scrub where cliffs or tall trees are not available.
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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