3 Apply the general description of at least two theories andor traditions to

3 apply the general description of at least two

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3. Apply the general description of at least two theories and/or traditions to specific instances. In addition, students will fulfill the following Residential College SLOs : 1. Synthesize information from multiple fields of study, practices, literacies, and perspectives. 2. Communicate complex ideas. 3. Consider ethical, social, and cultural contexts when addressing challenges. 4. Illustrate cultural responsiveness in interactions with a variety of individuals and/or diverse communities. TEACHING METHODS: In order to achieve learning goals, students will participate in small group and whole class discussion, reflections, a just war project, and instructor and peer feedback. In an effort to build community, students will complete many discussions and in-class assignments in teams. In general, every member of the team earns the same grade. However, I also rely on student feedback to adjust individual scores to reflect each student’s level of participation. Please get to know each other as best you can, as it will make our course more enjoyable for everyone. Technology is usually not permitted , since it can lead to distractions. Students should put away all cell phones, tablets, laptops, and other electronic devices at the beginning of class. These items can be very distracting to other students, the instructor, and even yourself. Students who do not abide by this policy may be dismissed from class and counted absent. Occasionally, however, there may be times when it would be appropriate to access online resources in class in order to complete assignments. I will announce when technology will be allowed. Students with documented disabilities who need technology for note-taking, for example, will be allowed to use laptops and other devices. Please see the Accommodations section below for details. ASSIGNMENTS FOR ACHIEVING LEARNING OUTCOMES: Reading Reflections At three points throughout the semester, students will reflect on a specific set of readings and what they found to be most significant about them. These reflections should include comments or questions students have about the readings, as well as connections between readings or across previous courses they have taken. These reflections are designed to teach students to use writing as a means of learning complex ideas, which will be beneficial when working on the just war project. Below is the rubric evaluating student reflections: C RITERIA F OR E VALUATING S TUDENT R EFLECTIONS Exceeds Expectations Makes provocative comments and/or asking insightful questions; places the reading within a broader context by referencing other historical events, ideas, movements, and or individuals (text-to-text or text-to-world); when applicable, makes original connections between the reading and the student (text-to-self). Meets Expectations Makes surface-level comments about the readings, which suggests the student could make more insightful observations with more time and practice; could do a better job of placing the reading within a broader context by making connections with other texts, the world, or oneself.
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  • Spring '14
  • Laws of war, jus ad bellum, Michael Walzer

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