81 What are the researchers responsibilities with regards to anonymity in

81 what are the researchers responsibilities with

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81) What are the researcher's responsibilities with regards to anonymity in survey and observation research? Answer An ethical issue that is salient in survey and observation research is respondents' anonymity. Researchers have an obligation to not disclose respondents' names to outside parties, including the client. This is all the more critical if the respondents were promised anonymity in order to obtain their participation. The client is not entitled to the names of respondents. Only when respondents are notified in advance and their consent is obtained prior to administering the survey can their names be disclosed to the client. Even in such situations, the researcher should have the assurance that the client will not use respondents' names in sales efforts or misuse them in other ways. Often the behavior of people is observed without their knowledge because informing the respondents may alter their behavior. However, this can violate the respondents' privacy. One guideline is that people should not be observed for research in situations where they would not expect to be observed by the public. However, observing people in public places like a mall or a grocery store is appropriate if certain procedures are followed. Notices should be posted in these areas stating that they are under observation for marketing research purposes. After the data have been collected, the researcher should obtain the necessary permission from the respondents. If any of the respondents refuse to grant permission, the observation records pertaining to them should be destroyed. These guidelines should also be applied when using cookies on the Internet. 1) TRUE 2) FALSE 3) TRUE 4) FALSE 5) TRUE 6) FALSE 7) FALSE 8) TRUE 9) TRUE 10) TRUE
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11) TRUE 12) TRUE 13) FALSE 14) TRUE 15) TRUE 16) FALSE 17) FALSE 18) FALSE 19) TRUE 20) TRUE 21) FALSE 22) FALSE 23) FALSE 24) TRUE 25) TRUE 26) TRUE 27) TRUE 28) TRUE 29) TRUE 30) TRUE
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31) TRUE 32) FALSE 33) TRUE 34) B 35) B 36) A 37) D 38) A 39) B 40) D 41) D 42) C 43) A 44) A 45) D 46) B 47) D 48) A 49) D 50) A
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51) D 52) D 53) C 54) C 55) D 56) B 57) C 58) D 59) C 60) D 61) D 62) B 63) A 64) C 65) C 66) D 67) D 68) C 69) D 70) A
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71) B 72) C 73) D 74) C 75) D 76) Personal interviewing methods may be categorized as in - home, mall intercept, or computer - assisted. In personal in - home interviews, respondents are interviewed face - to - face in their homes. The interviewer's task is to contact the respondents, ask the questions, and record the responses. In mall intercept personal interviews, respondents are intercepted while they are shopping in malls and brought to test facilities in the malls. The interviewer then administers a questionnaire as in the in - home personal survey. The advantage of mall intercept interviews is that it is more efficient for the respondent to come to the interviewer than for the interviewer to go to the respondent. In computer - assisted personal interviewing (CAPI), the respondent sits in front of a computer terminal and answers a questionnaire on the computer screen by using the keyboard or a mouse. Help screens and courteous error messages are also provided. The colorful screens and on - and off -
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