Tobacco cessation fall 2011 Instructor (1)_ For use in lecture (3)

It is the most important thing you can do to protect

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Unformatted text preview: It is the most important thing you can do to protect your health now and in the future. I have training to help my patients quit, and when you are ready, I will work with you to design a specialized treatment plan.” ADVISE The 5 A’s (cont’d) Assess readiness to make a quit attempt ASSESS Assist with the quit attempt Not ready to quit: provide motivation (the 5 R’s) Ready to quit: design a treatment plan Recently quit: relapse prevention ASSIST Arrange follow-up care ARRANGE The 5 A’s (cont’d) Number of sessions Estimated quit rate* 0 to 1 12.4% 2 to 3 16.3% 4 to 8 20.9% More than 8 24.7% * 5 months (or more) postcessation Provide assistance throughout the quit attempt. Provide assistance throughout the quit attempt. Fiore et al. (2008). Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: 2008 Update. Clinical Practice Guideline. Rockville, MD: USDHHS, PHS, May 2008. The 5 A’s: REVIEW ASK about tobacco USE ADVISE tobacco users to QUIT ASSESS READINESS to make a quit attempt ASSIST with the QUIT ATTEMPT ARRANGE FOLLOW-UP care Faced with change, most people are not ready to act. Change is a process, not a single step. Typically, it takes multiple attempts. HOW CAN I LIVE WITHOUT TOBACCO? The (DIFFICULT) DECISION to QUIT HELPING SMOKERS QUIT IS a CLINICIAN’S RESPONSIBILITY THE DECISION TO QUIT LIES IN THE HANDS OF EACH PATIENT. TOBACCO USERS DON’T PLAN TO FAIL. MOST FAIL TO PLAN. Clinicians have a professional obligation to address tobacco use and can have an important role in helping patients plan for their quit attempts. ASSESSING READINESS to QUIT STAGE 1: Not thinking about changing anytime soon STAGE 2: Considering changing, but not yet STAGE 3: Getting ready to change soon STAGE 4: In the process of changing STAGE 5: Changed a while ago Patients differ in their readiness to quit. Maintenance Contemplation Action Preparation Pre- contemplation Relapse * Not ready to quit Assess readiness to quit (or to stay quit) at each patient contact. For most patients, quitting is a cyclical process, and their readiness to quit (or stay quit) will change over time. ASSESSING READINESS to QUIT (cont’d) Does the patient now use tobacco? Is the patient ready to quit now? Preparation Precontemplation- or - Contemplation Yes Yes No Did the patient once use tobacco? Action- or - Maintenance Never smoker Yes No No IS a PATIENT READY to QUIT? STAGE 1: Precontemplation Not thinking about quitting in the next 6 months Some patients are aware of the need to quit....
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Tobacco cessation fall 2011 Instructor (1)_ For use in lecture (3)

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