any student whom they are in a position to evaluate or supervise by virtue of

Any student whom they are in a position to evaluate

This preview shows page 43 - 46 out of 204 pages.

any student whom they are in a position to evaluate or supervise by virtue of their teaching, research, or administrative responsibilities. Even if a student consents to an amorous relationship with a UNC teacher, it is considered to be a violation of the policy. The entire text of the UNC Amorous Relations Policy is included in Appendix F of this handbook. One way to make students more comfortable coming to your office is to offer both group and individual office hours
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36 Strategies for Inclusive Teaching Guidelines for Inclusive Teaching • Get to know your students as individuals rather than as representatives of particular groups. • Never ask a student to speak for a whole group (e.g., for women, for Hispan- ics, for Muslims). • Accommodate different learning styles and promote collaboration between students. • Do not let injurious statements pass without comment. • Allow students to disagree with you or others, but within guidelines that promote a safe learning atmosphere in the classroom. • Reflect diverse backgrounds on your syllabus, in your readings, and in other materials such as visual aids. • Depersonalize controversial topics and structure assignments to let students choose topics with which they are comfortable. • Understand why you have designed your syllabus in the way that you have. • Make your course goals clear to all students and give continual feedback on how students are meeting them. Conclusion This chapter has presented general guidelines that will help to establish a more comfortable learning environment for all students, regardless of their diverse back- grounds. The number of suggestions in this chapter may feel overwhelming. How- ever, you are probably already applying many of the principles for inclusive teaching we have discussed. It is unreasonable to expect to completely change your teaching style overnight. Allow yourself time to gradually apply diversity issues to your course, focusing first on the aspects of your course that are easiest to change while develop- ing strategies to address the more difficult aspects.
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37 Part II Group Profiles: Who Studies at UNC? Part I of this handbook discussed how teachers can begin to make their classrooms more welcoming and inclusive for all types of students. But exactly who are these students, and what are their experiences at UNC? In 1991–1992 the Center for Teaching and Learning conducted extensive in- terviews with students from different student organizations on campus. From these interviews come the material for Part II of this handbook— group profiles of the various kinds of minority groups that make up the student population at UNC. Some of the groups are easily identifiable, such as the major racial groups. Other chapters discuss the concerns of students with less visible types of diversity, such as students with learning disabilities or minority religious views.
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