Necessary perhaps inevitable but not desirable as it

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: necessary, perhaps inevitable, but not desirable, as it has been for decades. All of this because America's current leaders are not willing to acknowledge the very real concerns of many people about global environmental issues. No one can expect the United States to provide any quick fixes, but one would like to see America make a credible and sustained effort, along with other countries, to address global environmental problems . This should happen
on two fronts. The first is at home in the United States, through more environmentally friendly policies, for example greater fuel-efficiency standards for cars and light trucks and better insulation for buildings. The second is international, through a more cooperative approach to multilateral attempts at safeguarding the environment . Simply rejecting international treaties (like the Kyoto Protocol) then failing to offer a better proposal cannot be an acceptable option for American policymakers. Much of the world has come together to help the United States in the fight against terrorism, out of the realization that a common threat can only be beaten through a cooperative effort. It is high time for the United States, metaphorically speaking, to get out of its oversized, gas-guzzling S.U.V. -- and join the rest of the world in doing more to combat global warming and protecting the planet Environmental leadership is key to overall heg Donilon, 13 (Tom, American lawyer and former government official who served as National Security Advisor in the Obama administration, 6-15-13, “Energy and American Power”, - american-power , amp) Although it is typically discussed in terms of its energy, environmental or economic implications, the changes to the climate are also a national security challenge because of the increasingly severe environmental impacts it is having on countries and people around the world . Last year, the lower 48 U.S. states endured the warmest year on record. At one point, two-thirds of the contiguous United States was in a state of drought , and almost ten million acres were charred from wildfires in the west. Although no single weather event can be directly attributed to climate change, we know that climate change is fueling more frequent extreme weather events. Last year alone, Americans endured 11 weather-related disasters that cost $1 billion or more in damages. The same is true globally: the past 12 years are among the 14 warmest years on record. The Obama administration’s National Security Strategy recognizes the “real, urgent, and severe” threat posed by climate change in no uncertain terms, stating, “change wrought by a warming planet will lead to new conflicts over refugees and resources; new suffering from drought and famine; catastrophic natural disasters; and the degradation of land across the globe.” The Department of Defense’s 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review warned not only that climate change “may act as an accelerant of instability

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