Experiences emotions and feelings should have nothing

This preview shows 2 out of 4 pages.

Experiences, emotions, and feelings should have nothing to do with your decision, only duty. Since suicide is almost always a choice brought on by some combination of terrible experiences or feelings, Kant cannot even fathom why people would contemplate it. Kant also believes that by killing yourself you are defying any other duties that you should actually follow. His train of thought being that if you kill yourself then you have destroyed any possibility of completing your duties. The strength of Kant's theory regarding euthanasia is the same strength that all of his theories carry, it provides absolute certainty in every situation. Kant makes no exceptions, he allows for no confusion, he feels that suicide is wrong no matter the circumstances. However, Kant's argument is not without its flaws. Kant excludes all feelings and emotions, things that I would certainly like to consult if I were in a situation where suicide seemed a preferable option. Kant's robotic drive for logic and the 'good will' compels us to survive no matter what, but only so that we may complete our duties. But if we have no will to live, then we are not motivated to accomplish any duties, and if we have no duties to perform then there is no point to life according to Kant. Perhaps the biggest weakness that I find in Kant's theory comes from the fact that he seemingly contradicts himself. Kant forbids suicide, but he is a huge supporter of capital punishment. He claims that it is our duty to inflict punishment to
Image of page 2

Subscribe to view the full document.

A08473882 criminals,that ending their existence and extinguishing their will against their wishes is somehow more moral than a person choosing to die. The counterpoint to Kant's cold unflinching proclamation that suicide is wrong, comes from Mill and the Utilitarians. They are a much more understanding bunch, and in the place of the categorical imperative, they substitute the Greatest Happiness Principle. The greatest happiness principle, or GHP, is the Utilitarian belief that the morally correct action is the one that brings about the most intense happiness. In the end Utilitarians should behave in whatever way creates the most happiness, and they consider little else. There are two main types of Utilitarianism, act Utilitarianism and rule Utilitarianism. Act Utilitarianism says that we should analyze every individual situation and consider all the different outcomes and figure out which ones lead to the the most happiness. Rule Utilitarianism attempts to set up some basic guidelines that you should follow to achieve the most happiness in any given situation. However, since there are so many exceptions to what makes certain people happy, rule utilitarianism basically breaks down into act utilitarianism. Utilitarians would have to examine the person that desired euthanasia and attempt to decipher which course of action would lead to the most happiness. On one hand, they would consider the happiness of the person attempting to receive euthanasia. They have to figure out if the person's unhappiness with life is so great that it outweighs the happiness of his family and friends if he survived.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4
You've reached the end of this preview.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern