Freedom of religious expression and a sense within religious communities that

Freedom of religious expression and a sense within

This preview shows page 208 - 210 out of 508 pages.

Freedom of religious expression, and a sense within religious communities that their own religious expression contributes to greater social cohesion; The widespread political participation of citizens not only in electoral procedures but also in other areas of political activity, particularly at a local level; A sense of community ownership of the local environment as well as local services and amenities; Mechanisms for a community to fulfil its own needs, where possible, through community action;
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182 S. McKenzie Mechanisms for political advocacy to meet needs that cannot be met by commu- nity action; Mechanisms for a community to collectively identify its strengths and needs; A system for transmitting awareness of social sustainability from one generation to the next; A sense of community responsibility for maintaining that system of transmission. Education for Sustainability The lack of focus on the social as a separate entity can lead to some muddled thinking when it comes to applying sustainability to everyday practice. In the case of education, this means that there are many quite different types of activity which are spoken about under the general heading of education for sustainability, and that very little distinction is made between them in the literature. In this chapter and in AVESS work generally, a distinction is made between ‘education for sustainability’ and ‘education for a sustainable workforce’. These are the two main columns in the Table 13.1. The literature review has revealed that, as well as the confusion between these two fields of concern, both of them are not well studied in regard to work in AVE settings. The AVESS project seeks to find and study activity in AVE settings that bridges the gap between these two concerns. In other words, we are looking for activity that combines ‘getting a job with AVE’ and ‘ethics and values in AVE’. Education for sustainability (ethics and values in AVE) refers to the provision of knowledge for sustainability within education settings – both formal and informal. For example, primary school students may be taught about the need to value the environment, or college students may be encouraged to take a course on demo- cratic citizenship. Both of these learning activities pass on values or skills associ- ated with sustainability to future generations, or embed them in the current work- force. Research projects in this line of inquiry focus on the design and effectiveness of these educational programmes leading to new curricula, or the restructuring of existing educational programmes. Education for a sustainable workforce (getting a job with AVE) treats education as a necessary component of a sustainable society/economy. It is obvious that poor education is a chief cause of unemployment, and also that unemployment is a key factor in social exclusion and economic instability. Research in this area normally focuses on the initial causes of labour market exclusion (poor education), and on
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