Why We Dream Unsure exactly why we dream but involved in 1processing emotional

Why we dream unsure exactly why we dream but involved

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Why We Dream Unsure exactly why we dream, but involved in: 1. processing emotional memories 2. integrating new experiences with established memories 3. learning new strategies, ways of doing things 4. simulating threatening events so we can better cope with them in everyday life 5. reorganizing Freud’s Dream Protection Theory During sleep, the ego is less able to keep our sexual & aggressive instincts under control Dreams transform our sexual and aggressive instincts into symbols that represent wish fulfillment Require interpretation to reveal true meaning manifest content: details of the dream that you would share latent content: hidden meaning of the dream Activation-Synthesis Theory
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Dreams are the activated brain’s attempt to make sense of random, internally generated neural signals during REM sleep o Acetylcholine activates nerve cells in the Pons o pons send signals to forebrain, which tries to make sense of it o Lower levels of serotonin and norepinephrine associated with decreased reflective thought, reasoning, attention, memory. o Amygdala activated, adding emotions to the mix! Neurocognitive Perspective Dreams are the meaningful product of our “cognitive capacities” o reflect our gradual development o dictate the content of our dreams Evidence o children’s dreams are simple, lacking movement, negative emotionality o children’s dreams are also more infrequent o adult’s dreams are more complex, bizarre Hallucinations Perceptual experiences in the absence of external stimuli (aka seeing/ hearing things that aren't really there) Visual auditory cortex are active when people report hearing or seeing things o underscores link between perceptual experiences and brain activity! 10-39% of population reports having at least one Chapter 6 Classical and Operant conditioning Learning Change in an organism’s behavior or thought as a result of experience Sensitization— responding more strongly to the same stimulus over time o E.g. dangerous, irritating (someone mimicking you) Habituation— responding less strongly to the same stimulus over time o E.g. loud snorers don’t hear themselves (eventually you stop hearing them) Types of Learning Classical Conditioning— learning to link two stimuli in a way that helps us anticipate an event to which we have a reaction Associative Learning British Associationists (1800s): school of thinkers who believed that we acquire all of our knowledge by conditioning Conditioning— form associations between stimuli once connection is made, we only need one element to retrieve the other from memory Simple associations— mental building blocks for higher order thinking
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Ivan Pavlov Russian physiologist and 1904 Nobel Prize winner Most famous for work on digestion of dog Made an unexpected discovery about how animals learning Became known as classical conditioning!
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