See healthglencoecom for help in planning and

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See health.glencoe.com for help in planning and building your own Web site. Lesson 4 Weather Emergencies and Natural Disasters 729 Earthquakes A n is a violent shaking movement of the earth’s surface. Earthquakes can occur in all parts of the United States, but they are most common west of the Rocky Mountains. California alone averages almost 5,000 weak but detectable quakes each year. Most casualties dur- ing earthquakes are caused by falling objects or collapsing structures. If you live in an area prone to earthquakes, make sure bookcases and other tall or heavy furniture are bolted to the wall. Follow these safety procedures in the event of an earthquake: If you are inside a building, stand or crouch in a strongly supported doorway, brace yourself in an inside corner of the building, or get under a piece of sturdy furniture. Cover your head with your arms or a pillow. If you are outdoors when the earthquake hits, stay away from buildings, trees, and power lines. Use caution after the tremors have stopped. Stay out of damaged buildings. Be aware that utilities such as electrical or gas lines may be damaged and hazardous. Be prepared for aftershocks— smaller quakes that occur after the main earthquake. earthquake Applying Health Skills Accessing Information. Use online or print resources to obtain a recommended list of items that should be included in an earthquake emergency kit. Write a PSA detailing the items in the kit. Post the information on a public display board. The hazards of an earthquake continue after the shaking has stopped. Identify measures established in your community to prepare for disasters. health.glencoe.com
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H E A L T H C U L T U R E & C O M M U N I T Y A nne Rekerdres likes to call it “the everlasting punishment.” When the 17-year-old North Dallas senior came home with a speeding ticket, her dad, Randy, slapped the back bumper of her beloved car with a sticker that read: “How’s my driving? 1-866-2-TELLMOM.” “It was humiliat- ing,” says Anne. Still, there was nothing she could do. Recalls Randy, “I told her, ‘If the sticker comes off, there go your keys.’” Tattletale bumper stickers, which publicize where to call to notify parents about bad driving, are a trend that won’t end soon. Besides the Web site on which Anne’s dad bought hers, two other services—the San Diego–based Dad’s Eyes (877- DADS-EYES) and 800-4-MYTEEN of Arlington, Texas—also allow strangers to report on teen driving. The stickers have even become popular in Texas’s municipal court system, where several judges regularly sentence speeding teens to six months with the embarrassing banners. Do the stickers actually make teens drive more safely? Stephanie Collins, 16, from Green Bay, Wisconsin, thinks so. “I always think about the sticker when I’m driving. When other drivers do something stupid, sometimes I feel like I want to cut them off, but then I remember the sticker is there, and I stay calm.” Anne’s dad agrees. “As long as she perceives she can be reported,” says Randy, “it works.” His
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