March 1 2016 chapter 1 léonce does not regard his

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March 1, 2016
Chapter 1: Léonce does not regard his wife as a partner in marriage so much as a possession. How is this established by: The simile Chopin uses to describe his reaction to Edna’s sunburn Leyonce acknowledges his wife as “burnt beyond recognition” as if the sunburn on her face makes her a different person, and as if being sunburnt is ruining her beauty. This is established through the use of a simile so make a comparison. Chapter 2: What do you learn about Edna’s upbringing? In what ways does it place her at a potential disadvantage in the wealthy French Creole society of New Orleans into which she has married? . She has a disadvantage because she is from Kentucky, and also American, while everyone in her community is creole and rich. She doesn’t come from a wealthy background and the women are submissive. Chapter 3: Identify the figures of speech and explain its meaning. “The sound of the sea] broke like a mournful lullaby upon the night.” This simile shows how the sea was nowhere near uplifting at this hour, but instead it was a sad feeling that it was bringing rather than joyful. “Her vague anguish was like a shadow, like a mist passing across her soul’s summer day.” This simile shows the sense of unfamiliarity that has with agony. It’s a shadow and a mist because it’s not detectible. March 4, 2016 Chapter 4: Creole society defines the ideal wife as “a mother-woman.” In what ways does Mr. Pontellier consider Edna to fall short of this ideal? A mother-woman is supposed to attend to not only their husband but their children as well. A mother woman is someone who is obedient to their husband and follows all the rules. The mother woman does not work but instead is a housewife and spends her day attending to her childrens needs all the time. Edna falls short because she doesn’t attend to her kids, and they have reached the point where they are almost independent. In what ways is Adele Ratignolle an ‘embodiment’ of this ideal? Adele Ratignolle embodies this idea because she is beautiful and attends to her husband at all times. Comment on the figurative language used. The author goes into very great detail about Madame Ratignolle, comparing her lips to cherries by stating “some other delicious crimson fruit.” Chapter 5: Explain why “the Creole husband is never jealous.” The Creole husband is never jealous because “the gangrene passion is one which has become dwarfed by disuse.” Basically, jealousy is not common because they’re not passionate or romantic.
Chapter 7: Comment on the contrasting ways in which Edna and Adele are dressed. (“The women were both … of line could not have done.”) How does Chopin use dress to symbolize the differences between the two women? Madame Ratignolle described as a more feminine, traditional, girly figure while Edna has more of a “masculine” physique with a strong body, being more handsome then pretty. It even shows how Madame is more worrisome of her complexion, as the social “norm” of females is to be worried about how they look, showing the differing values between the women.

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