Then doctors did not want to do ct scan and just gave

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and that did not work. Then doctors did not want to do CT scan and just gave her an Nsaid. That did not resolve the issue wither and her headache kept getting more intense to the point that she vomited. At this point I escalated they need to do a scan. Though she did not exhibit another signs and symptoms of stroke except those two I mentioned, they are signs of cerebral aneurysm, it is safer than sorry not to do a stat CT. The doctors agreed to it and ordered Stat CT to be done, result came out showed she had a small bulging cerebral aneurysm in the parietal lobe. We needed to transfer her and address the issue right away. I was glad that during that time I was more knowledgeable about stroke and aneurysm symptoms due to a paper I was writing as well. ---Great job :). This just goes to show the correlation between education and patient outcomes. Because of your stroke training and certification, you were able to intervene quickly by assessing the patient and activate the proper protocols you helped save a patient’s life. this is what higher level of education can do for all of us. This is another reason I am continuing my education in order to become an NP and be able to provide primary care services. ---This is a great example of the need for higher education. In the same sense, I have had similar situations occur in oncology. I am chemotherapy certified, which requires the knowledge of all the different types of chemotherapy and their possible side effects and possible reactions. I had a patient that had received a medication that can cause rigors. This patient had made it completely through the administration of the medication and as I was getting ready to disconnect the patient, he stated he suddenly was very cold and couldn't stop trembling. I knew this to be a reaction to the chemotherapy and had to call for the physician to come to the infusion area so we could continue to intervene with the PRN medications. The patient responded well, and ended up being fine, however, had I not known the side effects/reaction, he may not have had the outcome he did. 2 posts Re: Topic 3 DQ 1 So glad that you intervene, because sometimes doctors do not want to listen to us. Another situation I was in, that my patient had fever, high WBC, and pain 10/10,. I asked doctor to do lactic acid. He actually agree to do it. When result came in his LA was 7.8. With LA of 7.8 doctor ordered fluids of 100ml/hr . I literally have to beg him to give him at least 1000 ml bolus. His kidney function was fine. There was no reason not to give patient more fluid. Sometimes we have to be very strong to stand up for our patients.
Re: Topic 3 DQ 1 An important point to consider is that nursing education level plays a significant role in patient outcome and safety. Studies not only shows that a BSN is beneficial for improving the nurse's knowledge, career path, financial stability, and personal growth but most importantly, it benefits patients' outcome. The study, “Effects of Hospital Care Environment on Patient Mortality and Nurse

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