Inappropriate fire regimes drought and climate change

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along deeply incised creeklines. Inappropriate fire regimes, drought and climate change: A high fire frequency is likely to be deleterious to Tmesipteris parva . This scenario might have been considered unlikely in the past given the fire-protected nature of its fern gully habitat. However, drought over the past 10–15 years has caused widespread mortality in treeferns in gullies and creeks across King Island, the consequence being a diminution of habitat for Tmesipteris parva and an increased likelihood of fire (Wapstra et al. 2009). Epiphytic ferns have all but disappeared from King Island as a result of the drought, with the probable extinction of Tmesipteris parva from the Grassy River catchment. Drying conditions associated with climate change would in all likelihood exacerbate these trends. Stochastic risk: The small size of the extant subpopulation near Naracoopa, with just ten plants on a single treefern, means that the stochastic risk of endangerment is extremely high. Recovery Actions specific to King Island Provide information and extension support to the King Island Natural Resource Management committee, King Island council, Government agencies and the local community on the location, significance and management of known subpopulations and areas of potential habitat; Surveys to determine the species’ full extent on King Island — this should include determining the status of the reported site in the Grassy River catchment, and the identification of management issues; Negotiate with landholders to ensure that the Naracoopa and Grassy River sites are protected. Encourage landholders to consider protection of habitat through a vegetation management agreement or conservation covenant under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation Act 2002 ; Ensure known sites are secure from cattle and check the condition of existing fences annually; Identify known sites as fire-exclusion zones within the King Island Wildfire Management Plan and, in the event of wildfire, where practicable take measures to protect the sites; King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 145
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Monitor known subpopulations biennially to determine the level of recruitment and/or plant loss; if monitoring identifies a decline in subpopulations, and then adopt an adaptive management approach to minimise the impacts of threats. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 146
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Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi (King Island Brown Thornbill) Description Brown Thornbills ( Acanthiza pusilla ) occur in south-eastern mainland Australia and Tasmania. The King Island Brown Thornbill ( Acanthiza pusilla archibaldi ) is a subspecies and differs from the Tasmanian mainland subspecies, Acanthiza pusilla diemensis, by having a distinctly longer bill, 16.2 mm compared to 11–13 mm (Bryant & Jackson 1999).
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