Glencoe Health 2005.pdf

Regular participation in vigorous physical activity

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Regular participation in vigorous physical activity declines significantly during the teen years, from 73 percent of ninth graders to 61 percent of twelfth graders. Only 29 percent of teens attend a daily physical education class—a serious decline from 42 percent in 1991. Clearly, many teens have a , or a way of life that involves little physical activity. They may spend much of their time watching TV, playing video games, or working on the com- puter rather than being physically active. The negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle may include unhealthful weight gain, which is linked to several potentially life-threatening conditions, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among Americans. Diabetes is a serious disorder that prevents the body from converting food into energy. sedentary lifestyle 77 Lesson 1 Physical Activity and Your Health diabetes For more informa- tion on reducing your risk of developing diabetes, see Chapter 26, page 691. Responsibility. When you partici- pate in regular physical activity, you take responsibility for your health. By taking care of yourself, you are saying that you are worth investing in. Be positive about the benefits these activities bring you, and don’t forget to compliment yourself: “I like how I feel, and I like how I look!” Write three other positive state- ments that reflect the benefits you receive from regular physical activity.
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an increased risk of a condition characterized by a decrease in bone density, producing porous and fragile bones. Porous and fragile bones fracture more easily than healthy bones. a reduced ability to manage stress. decreased opportunities to meet and form friendships with active people who value and live a healthy lifestyle. You can lower your risk of these and many other health problems by including more physical activity in your daily life. For example, when you go shopping, walk to the store or, if you have to drive, park farther away from the entrance. Figure 4.1 suggests other healthful alternatives to sedentary activities. Physical Activity and Weight Control he CDC reports that more than one-half of American T adults and 14 percent of teens are overweight. This situation can be traced to a sedentary lifestyle and overeating. To stay within a weight range that is healthy for you, it’s important to develop good eating habits and be physically active on a regular basis. Understanding how the food you eat gets converted into energy can help you maintain a healthy weight. is the process by which your body gets energy from food. Food’s energy value is mea- sured in units of heat called calories. Your body needs a sufficient number of calories each day to function properly. Additional calo- ries must be burned through physical activity or they will be stored in the body as fat. When you are physically active, your metabolic rate rises and your body burns more calories than when it is at rest.
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