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001.Introduction

Bunsen burner your bunsen burner produces a premixed

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Bunsen Burner Your Bunsen Burner produces a Premixed Flame. Natural Gas (Methane) and Air (Oxygen) are mixed (1:1) within the Barrel and ignition results in very high Temperatures that ionize Molecules, resulting in a characteristic Blue Flame. You’ll notice there’s a bright, inner Cone of deep Blue (the Tip of which is the hottest Part of the Flame [~1200°C]) and a pale, outer Cone of light Blue (this is a much cooler Part of the Flame [~1000°C]). Please note that when properly adjusted, the Flame of your Bunsen Burner is all but Invisible. A Candle produces a Diffusion Flame. The Air (Oxygen) diffuses toward the Fuel, resulting in a bright Yellow, wavering Flame (~900°C). Petri Plates We use Disposable Plastic Petri Plates. Each consists of a Lid and a slightly smaller Bottom (usually filled with Agar). Notice that there are three Notches on the Bottom of each Petri Plate. We’ll use these Notches as Guides for our “T-Streaking” Technique. Our All-Singing, All-Dancing Nutrient Agar Medium is marked with a single Black Stripe. Other Media will have different colored Stripes. Petri Plates are always incubated upside-down. About 95% of the Time you’re using a Petri Plate you’re doing so to isolate individual Colonies (“Buttons”) of Bacteria. Plates go from Room Temperature to an Incubator and (almost always) to a Cold Room, so Condensation is an unavoidable Nuisance. We incubate our Petri Plates upside-down so any Condensation on the Inside of the Lid cannot drip onto the Agar Surface and allow Bacteria in separated Colonies to “run” together. Petri Plates are always labeled on the Bottom (where the Bacteria will be growing on the Agar). If Petri Plates are to be incubated individually, you should label each Petri Plate with your Name or Initials, the Name of the Bacterium (or Isolate), and the Date. Later in the Lab we’ll be incubating “Stacks” of Petri Plates containing the same Bacteria. In this Case, you can use a very simple Label on each individual Petri Plate but put the complete Information on the Tape you use to form the Stack of Plates. Individual Petri Plates do not need to be taped shut. Gravity has proven to be quite reliable in all of our Incubators.
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Introduction to MIC 101 Page 6 Inoculating Loop We use an Nichrome Wire Loop on a Stainless Steel or Aluminum Handle to scoop-up and transfer Bacteria from one Container to another. Nichrome is the same Alloy used for Heating Elements on Ranges and Electric Space Heaters and you’ll recognize the same Orange Incandescence. Your Loop should always be Sterilized before use by heating it in your Bunsen Burner until the Wire glows. (Your Inoculating Loop is in a Black Block on your Bench Top.) To sterilize your Loop, light your Bunsen Burner. Put the Base of the Loop (where it joins the Handle) at the Top of the inner, Dark Blue Flame until your Loop begins to glow Space-Heater Orange. Slowly move your Loop across the Top of this inner Flame such that the Wire glows successively at the Base of the Wire, along the Wire itself, and finally at the Loop itself. It’s best to start at the Base and work outward toward the Loop so that if there’s any residual Liquid or Culture on the Loop it will be slowly heated and not spatter (which could result in Contamination).
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