Yelling fire in a crowded theater when there is no

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Yelling “fire” in a crowded theater when there is no fire is not protected speech. (2)Fighting words that are likely to provoke a hostile or violent response from an average person1 (3) Speech that incites the violent or revolutionary overthrow of the government. However, the mere abstract teaching of the morality and consequences of such action is protected. (4) Defamatory language, (5) Child Pornography,(6) Obscene Speech States are free to define what constitutes obscene speech. Movie theaters, magazine publishers, and so on are often subject to challenges that the materials they display or sell are obscene and therefore not protected by the First Amendment.
Freedom of religion is a key concept addressed by the First Amendment. The First Amendment contains two separate religion clauses: the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause . The Establishment Clause prohibits the government from either establishing a government-sponsored religion or promoting one religion over another. Thus, it guarantees that there will be no state-sponsored religion. The Free Exercise Clause prohibits the government from interfering with the free exercise of religion in the United States. Generally, this clause prevents the government from enacting laws that either prohibit or inhibit individuals from participating in or practicing their chosen religions. The Fourteenth Amendment was added to the U.S. Constitution in 1868. Its original purpose was to guarantee equal rights to all persons after the Civil War. The Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment provides that a state cannot “deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” There are THREE (3) Standards of Review for Equal Protection Clause; Strict scrutiny test, Intermediate scrutiny test, and Rational Basis Test. The Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution contain a Due Process Clause. These clauses provide that no person shall be deprived of “life, liberty, or property” without due process of the law. The substantive due process category of due process requires that government statutes, ordinances, regulations, and other laws be clear on their face and not overly broad in scope. The test of whether substantive due process is met is whether a “reasonable person” could understand the law to be able to comply with it. Laws that do not meet this test are declared void for vagueness. The procedural due process form of due process requires that the government give a person proper notice and hearing of legal action before that person is deprived of his or her life, liberty, or property. The Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides the government with this power. Private property can only be taken for public use. The Just Compensation Clause of the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution requires the government to compensate the property owner when it takes private property. Article IV of the Constitution contains the Privileges and Immunities Clause ,

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